PanSIG2020 / Sessions Go Compact View

09:00 Sat

TESOL JALT Virtual Symposium on Mind, Brain, and Language Education #201

Partner Event
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 09:00-10:30 JST

Sarah Rose Cavanagh—Embedded: The Social Neuroscience of Learning​

Human beings are ultrasocial creatures who learn best when embedded in a system of shared meaning. What lessons can we draw from the study of the social brain to design more effective learning environments?

Michael Burri—Zooming in on the Nexus between Neuroscience and Pronunciation Teaching

Pronunciation instruction has regained its lost prominence in the second language (L2) classroom. Yet, the connection between neuroscience and pronunciation teaching and learning has yet to be explored. The aim of this online session is to present and discuss with the audience several neuroscientific principles relevant to effective pronunciation instruction.

Julia Volkman—Stress and the Bilingual Brain

Join Julia for a quick overview of and lively conversation about the role of stress in learning (both helpful and problematic), the role of executive functions in language acquisition, and quick tips on how to use this knowledge to improve your teaching, both online and in-person.

​Stephen M. Ryan—The Shock of the New

Come share stories on how your brain has dealt with new environments. Culture shock? Culture bump? “The weirdest thing happened to me today”? We all have experiences of coping with the new and different. They can teach us a lot about how the brain learns and how we can nurture its natural predisposition to make sense of unexpected input.

Sarah Rose Cavanagh—Embedded: The Social Neuroscience of Learning​

Human beings are ultrasocial creatures who learn best when embedded in a system of shared meaning. What lessons can we draw from the study of the social brain to design more effective learning environments?

Michael Burri—Zooming in on the Nexus between Neuroscience and Pronunciation Teaching

Pronunciation instruction has regained its lost prominence in the second language (L2) classroom. Yet, the connection between neuroscience and pronunciation teaching and learning has yet to be explored. The aim of this online session is to present and discuss with the audience several neuroscientific principles relevant to effective pronunciation instruction.

Julia ... more

Speaker: Stephen M. Ryan

Stephen M. Ryan teaches and runs short-term Study Abroad programmes at Sanyo Gakuen University, in Okayama.

09:00 Sat

The Conference lobby #208

Open Space
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 09:00-15:00 JST

The space to hang out and talk to everyone.

The space to hang out and talk to everyone.

Host: Dawn Lucovich

PanSIG Virtual Conference Committee Chair / The University of Nagano, Assistant Professor / Nagano JALT, President

09:15 Sat

Opening Ceremony #207

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 09:15-09:35 JST

Welcome to PanSIG2020!

Welcome to PanSIG2020!

Speaker: Mehrasa Alizadeh

I am an assistant professor at Osaka University. I conduct collaborative research on learning analytics and in particular sensor technology to monitor and improve learner wakefulness, concentration, and engagement in ... more

Speaker: Gary Ross

Gary is a web developer, designer, and programmer, and the creator of Eventzil.la. He works as an Associate Professor at Kanazawa University where he develops the online learning program at ... more

Speaker: Dawn Lucovich

PanSIG Virtual Conference Committee Chair / The University of Nagano, Assistant Professor / Nagano JALT, President

Speaker: Joseph Tomei

Joseph Tomei is a professor in the Faculty of British and American Studies at Kumamoto Gakuen University. He has taught EFL in France, Spain, and Japan at the primary, secondary, ... more

Speaker: Linda K.

Speaker: Bill Pellowe

Bill Pellowe is an Associate Professor at Kindai University's Fukuoka Campus, where he has taught since 2000. He is currently JALT's Director of Public Relations. He started ELT Calendar (eltcalendar.com) ... more

Speaker: Pat Conaway

I teach EFL classes to freshman students in the medical, agriculture, engineering, humanities, and education departments. It’s a lot of fun seeing the different personalities of the students with such ... more

Host: Mark Brierley

Extensive reader. Low energy builder. Active Passivist. Passive activist.

09:45 Sat

Student-goal setting through letter writing #136

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 09:45-10:20 JST

This presentation will introduce letter writing as a way to improve students’ motivation in their language learning by having them set goals that they determine. Goal-setting is an approach to develop learner autonomy in the classroom. Learner autonomy is important because students need to have a sense of control in their language learning (Benson, 2011). The presenter will share the process of using letter writing in lessons. The study gathered data from approximately 80 surveys distributed at the middle and end of term during one semester from three different classes at a Liberal Arts university. The first was a mandatory English presentation class for first-year advanced intercultural communication students. The second was an elective cross-cultural communications class for second- to fourth-year students from various faculties. The third was an elective English discussion and meeting class also for second- to fourth-year students from various faculties. The strengths and limitations of the study based on current literature and student responses will be discussed. Finally, the presenter will offer suggestions for potential ways that participants can use this activity in English classes with learners who have varying levels of proficiencies in different educational settings.

This presentation will introduce letter writing as a way to improve students’ motivation in their language learning by having them set goals that they determine. Goal-setting is an approach to develop learner autonomy in the classroom. Learner autonomy is important because students need to have a sense of control in their language learning (Benson, 2011). The presenter will share the process of using letter writing in lessons. The study gathered data from approximately 80 surveys distributed at the middle and end of term during one semester from three different classes at a Liberal Arts university. The first was a mandatory ... more

Speaker: Devon Arthurson

For the past 11 years, I have been teaching in Japan. Currently, I work at Rikkyo University in Tokyo. My current teaching and research interests include fostering learner autonomy, shadowing ... more

09:45 Sat

Virtual reality in tourism education: A case study #151

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 09:45-10:20 JST

With the increasing amount of research and development conducted in the use of virtual reality (VR) in both vocational training and language learning, these two areas seem to be both represented in the context of tourism education. This study was conducted with 22 students in the Department of Global Tourism at a university in western Japan. The study was designed not only to detect English learning affordances, but also to glean insight into practical benefits and issues of using VR for tourism studies in the department curriculum. The students were trained to create virtual tours of their hometowns with Tour Creator, a VR platform developed by Google. Students then guided classmates on virtual tours of their hometowns in English, using smartphones and mini VR glasses. Following the virtual tours, all the students responded to a user experience questionnaire with Likert-type and open-ended items on virtual presence, perceived usefulness and future use of VR, as well as the pros and cons of the activity among others. The findings of this study have important implications for the use of virtual reality in tourism education in EMI (English-Medium Instruction) contexts. The experience also suggests other potentials in using VR in tourism education.

With the increasing amount of research and development conducted in the use of virtual reality (VR) in both vocational training and language learning, these two areas seem to be both represented in the context of tourism education. This study was conducted with 22 students in the Department of Global Tourism at a university in western Japan. The study was designed not only to detect English learning affordances, but also to glean insight into practical benefits and issues of using VR for tourism studies in the department curriculum. The students were trained to create virtual tours of their hometowns with Tour ... more

Speaker: Eric Hawkinson

Eric is a learning futurist, tinkering with and designing technologies that may better inform the future of teaching and learning. Eric is president and research coordinator of MAVR, a research ... more

Speaker: Mehrasa Alizadeh

I am an assistant professor at Osaka University. I conduct collaborative research on learning analytics and in particular sensor technology to monitor and improve learner wakefulness, concentration, and engagement in ... more

09:45 Sat

Inventing persuasive arguments for writing and discussion #206

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 09:45-10:20 JST

Whether students are ranking Marvel movies from best to worst or debating the potential value of increasing foreign workers, what they are doing in both cases is relying on general argument forms to persuade their audiences. Argumentation—the art of persuasion—is a skill with both social and academic validity for EFL students, but it has proven difficult to define, teach and learn (Hirvela, 2017). However, rhetoricians have taught that arguments take stock forms irrespective of their content (Keith & Lundberg, 2008), and these forms can be discovered by applying Aristotle’s common topics of conjecture, degree and possibility. The common topics are a generative heuristic that enable students to move beyond take-it-for-granted truisms and invent their own original, persuasive arguments on meaningful issues. In this presentation, participants will be shown how to apply the common topics to both general issues (e.g. Should discrimination be allowed?) and specific ones (e.g. Should Japanese medical universities be allowed to discriminate against applicants based on gender?) situated in Japan. Participants will then be able to generate persuasive arguments by applying the common topics to issues relevant to their own learners and contexts.

Whether students are ranking Marvel movies from best to worst or debating the potential value of increasing foreign workers, what they are doing in both cases is relying on general argument forms to persuade their audiences. Argumentation—the art of persuasion—is a skill with both social and academic validity for EFL students, but it has proven difficult to define, teach and learn (Hirvela, 2017). However, rhetoricians have taught that arguments take stock forms irrespective of their content (Keith & Lundberg, 2008), and these forms can be discovered by applying Aristotle’s common topics of conjecture, degree and possibility. The common topics are ... more

10:30 Sat

Developing L2 speaking skills with digital games #111

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 10:30-11:05 JST

While digital games are not often integrated into foreign language curricula at schools and universities, a growing body of literature in digital game-based language learning suggests that commercially-produced games can be an effective and highly engaging means of facilitating second-language acquisition. Previous studies have mainly focussed on vocabulary acquisition and on the benefits of online interaction between learners and L1 speakers of the target language. However, the potential of digital games to develop learners’ L2 speaking skills still remains largely unexplored. To better understand the learning mechanisms involved, a study was designed in which four groups of young adult Japanese learners of English played the cooperative puzzle game Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes over four one-hour gameplay sessions. An initial discourse analysis of learner language elicited through the gameplay activity will be presented. This analysis is informed by a cognitive interactionist SLA framework that posits instances of learners negotiating for meaning as evidence for second language acquisition. Evidence pointing to gains in discourse management, vocabulary, pronunciation accuracy, and oral fluency resulting from game-based interaction between learners will also be discussed.

While digital games are not often integrated into foreign language curricula at schools and universities, a growing body of literature in digital game-based language learning suggests that commercially-produced games can be an effective and highly engaging means of facilitating second-language acquisition. Previous studies have mainly focussed on vocabulary acquisition and on the benefits of online interaction between learners and L1 speakers of the target language. However, the potential of digital games to develop learners’ L2 speaking skills still remains largely unexplored. To better understand the learning mechanisms involved, a study was designed in which four groups of young adult Japanese ... more

Speaker: Michael Hofmeyr

Michael teaches English for academic purposes as well as introductory courses in general linguistics at Osaka University. He has published papers on methods for encouraging critical thinking in the Japanese ... more

10:30 Sat

Joining “The World’s Largest Lesson” with an oral English class #128

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 10:30-11:05 JST

This poster describes materials and activities related to the UN Goals for Sustainable development, in a university oral English class. The objectives of “The World’s Largest Lesson” are to stimulate teenagers to learn about global issues, specifically 17 goals outlined by the UN, and to implement actions to impact the global situation at local level. There is also a platform for teachers who want to connect their students with a global community of classes, using aps like skype, flipgrid and padlet. Participation takes place from September through to February, with the aim of students sharing presentations on their chosen themes and taking action locally. The presenter will explain the benefits and drawbacks of the project and investigate ways to deal with possible problems. The project was attempted in 2018-19 with mixed results, due to difficulties synchronizing schedules and integrating the SDGs content with other course content. Cultural differences also caused a difficulty. In 2019-20, measures such as pre-teaching about culture difference and habituating students to the use of flipgrid earlier in the semester, helped to make the exchange happen more smoothly, giving students a chance to practice presenting themselves on-line and connecting with near-peers in Europe.

This poster describes materials and activities related to the UN Goals for Sustainable development, in a university oral English class. The objectives of “The World’s Largest Lesson” are to stimulate teenagers to learn about global issues, specifically 17 goals outlined by the UN, and to implement actions to impact the global situation at local level. There is also a platform for teachers who want to connect their students with a global community of classes, using aps like skype, flipgrid and padlet. Participation takes place from September through to February, with the aim of students sharing presentations on their chosen themes ... more

Speaker: Ellen Head

I have taught EFL at university in Japan since 2000 and in Miyazaki since 2017. Research interests include Learner Development and SIGs I am involved with include LD, FLP and ... more

10:30 Sat

A case for scaffolding self-reflection #137

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 10:30-11:05 JST

It is through self-reflection that individuals are able to understand themselves, their context, and make sense of the connections. For students, self-reflection is a valuable tool in becoming more effective language learners, since those who are able to self-reflect have been shown to have a greater capacity for self-organising their behaviours than those who lack the ability (Deci & Ryan, 2000, Ryan & Deci, 2017 ). This presentation will argue for the need for more scaffolded self-reflective teaching practices based on the literature, and provide three mini-case studies on how self-reflection can be implemented in university settings. The first of these mini-case studies outlines materials developed for a reflective workshop conducted with 200+ sophomore students. The second will explore how written reflections when revisited with a critical eye, result in deeper, more critical reflective reports. The final case-study will provide insight into how group discussions can help build supportive classrooms and raise self-awareness. Each of these mini-case studies will demonstrate how student self-reflections elicited clearer goals and encouraged focused learning behaviours. The presentation will conclude with a call for audience participation to share the role of student self-reflection in their own classrooms.

It is through self-reflection that individuals are able to understand themselves, their context, and make sense of the connections. For students, self-reflection is a valuable tool in becoming more effective language learners, since those who are able to self-reflect have been shown to have a greater capacity for self-organising their behaviours than those who lack the ability (Deci & Ryan, 2000, Ryan & Deci, 2017 ). This presentation will argue for the need for more scaffolded self-reflective teaching practices based on the literature, and provide three mini-case studies on how self-reflection can be implemented in university settings. The first of ... more

Speaker: Phillip A. Bennett

Phillip A. Bennett is a Learning Advisor at Kanda University of International Studies as well as a long-term resident in Japan. He holds an MA TESOL and has over a ... more

10:30 Sat

Lights, Camera, Action: Showcasing Student Work #154

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 10:30-11:05 JST

A film-making project not only allows students to practice language skills, but also leads to a final product, one which has creative value to students and the world (Ford & Kluge 2015). Performance in Education proponents, Newmann and Wehlage (1995, p. 14), state that having students share their accomplishments with wider audiences through “outside” performance is a necessary step for what they call “authentic pedagogy.” The distribution phase is an essential aspect of the film-making process that provides great opportunities for the authentic performance of their product, but these works often get left in the dark. This presentation is aimed toward for teachers interested in film-making or interested in having their students take a more active role in the final stage by promoting and showcasing their films outside of the classroom or by participating in film festivals or contests. The presentation will detail the activities of English language students in a film-making course as they prepared to showcase their films at a school event and describe the development of an upcoming international student film festival, contest, and symposium for English language teachers and students to be held in Nagoya. Discussion on student films and other showcasing activities will follow.

A film-making project not only allows students to practice language skills, but also leads to a final product, one which has creative value to students and the world (Ford & Kluge 2015). Performance in Education proponents, Newmann and Wehlage (1995, p. 14), state that having students share their accomplishments with wider audiences through “outside” performance is a necessary step for what they call “authentic pedagogy.” The distribution phase is an essential aspect of the film-making process that provides great opportunities for the authentic performance of their product, but these works often get left in the dark. This presentation is aimed ... more

Speaker: Ashley Ford

Ashley Ford is a language lecturer at Nagoya City University in Nagoya, Japan. Her areas of interest include Creative Project-Based Learning and Performance in Education, especially through film-making and music ... more

Speaker: David Kluge

David Kluge (Professor, Nanzan University) has been teaching English in Japan for 35 years. He is a founding officer of the CALL SIG and founding coordinator of the Performance in ... more

10:30 Sat

Sponsored: Cambridge Introduction to Unlock 2nd edition #204

Sat, Jun 20, 10:30-11:05 JST

Unlock 2nd edition

Get your students thinking critically. A six-level skills-based English course. The ideal course for online teaching.

Unlock 2nd edition

Get your students thinking critically. A six-level skills-based English course. The ideal course for online teaching.

Host: David Moser

Senior ELT Representative for Cambridge University Press Japan

10:30 Sat

Adapting Immersive Technology for Learning Post-COVID-19 #150

SIG Forum
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 10:30-11:50 JST

A discussion around the latest research and development around immersive technologies in education. We will host a series of short presenters that will introduce innovative research and projects in immersive learning. The short presentations will be followed by a panel discussion and open Q&A around implementing immersive learning during and after the health crisis. The event will be in AltspaceVR, which is a free Social VR platform owned by Microsoft that can be loaded onto PC, Mac, and also iOS and Android devices. We will also be livestreaming from VR to YouTube for later viewing. Can visit http://mavr.site for detailed information.

A discussion around the latest research and development around immersive technologies in education. We will host a series of short presenters that will introduce innovative research and projects in immersive learning. The short presentations will be followed by a panel discussion and open Q&A around implementing immersive learning during and after the health crisis. The event will be in AltspaceVR, which is a free Social VR platform owned by Microsoft that can be loaded onto PC, Mac, and also iOS and Android devices. We will also be livestreaming from VR to YouTube for later viewing. Can visit http://mavr.site for detailed ... more

Speaker: Dave Dolan

Dave has been teaching for 30 years and holds a Masters in TESOL. After establishing an English school in Japan in 1993, his interests grew towards using technology to best ... more

Speaker: Kojiro Yano

I am an associate professor at Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Osaka Institute of Technology. I specialize in teaching and learning using virtual reality technology, particularly for language learning ... more

Speaker: Josh Brunotte

I am an associate professor in the Liberal Education Center at Aichi Prefectural University, near Nagoya. I am also the membership chair of the MAVR SIG.

Speaker: Mehrasa Alizadeh

I am an assistant professor at Osaka University. I conduct collaborative research on learning analytics and in particular sensor technology to monitor and improve learner wakefulness, concentration, and engagement in ... more

Speaker: Eric Hawkinson

Eric is a learning futurist, tinkering with and designing technologies that may better inform the future of teaching and learning. Eric is president and research coordinator of MAVR, a research ... more

11:15 Sat

Effects of Using AI and PeerEval in Teaching EFL #112

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 11:15-11:50 JST

The focus of this study was to investigate the use of AI speakers and the effectiveness of PeerEval software in improving English proficiency. The longitudinal investigation was carried out from April 2019 to January 2020 using Alexa, PeerEval, ATR CALL Brix, Facebook, Line, and online materials. The participants were 59 first-year students who were engaged in flipped learning lessons through CLIL for two semesters. Pre-test and post-test TOEIC scores, as well as post-training survey results, were used in evaluating the overall effectiveness of two groups. The participants were divided into two groups, one with using AI speakers (n=29) and the other with non-AI speakers (n=30). Non-AI participants were engaged in e-learning outside of the class. While the AI group is studying English with the AI speakers, participants recorded short movie clips of their learning experiences. AI group participants also kept written diaries with their observations about the contents and duration of their studies, periodically recording their thoughts using a smartphone. AI group indicated the improvement of TOEIC mean score from 407 (SD:113) to 604 (SD:92), and the non-AI group showed the increase from 447 (SD:93) to 598 (SD:147). Those who studied English with AI speakers outside of the classroom outperformed the group with non-users of AI speakers on a post-course TOEIC test. This research included some limitations in attempting to ascertain the effectiveness of using AI in teaching language and communication by exclusively focusing on the role of AI and students’ English skills.

The focus of this study was to investigate the use of AI speakers and the effectiveness of PeerEval software in improving English proficiency. The longitudinal investigation was carried out from April 2019 to January 2020 using Alexa, PeerEval, ATR CALL Brix, Facebook, Line, and online materials. The participants were 59 first-year students who were engaged in flipped learning lessons through CLIL for two semesters. Pre-test and post-test TOEIC scores, as well as post-training survey results, were used in evaluating the overall effectiveness of two groups. The participants were divided into two groups, one with using AI speakers (n=29) and the ... more

11:15 Sat

A Vocabulary Learning Strategies Course #138

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 11:15-11:50 JST

In this poster presentation, a vocabulary learning strategies course which develops student autonomy is described. The course is structured using an iterative approach to engage students in creating, evaluating, and revising individual learning plans based upon personal needs analysis. These plans are appraised and reformulated as students gradually discover more about vocabulary learning strategies. The course culminates in two projects; one in which learners in pairs create authentic texts to demonstrate their ability to use vocabulary in context, and the other, in which they teach vocabulary learning strategies to a class of their peers. The presentation will not only explain the design and contents of the course, but also subsequent changes to the course going into its second year.

In this poster presentation, a vocabulary learning strategies course which develops student autonomy is described. The course is structured using an iterative approach to engage students in creating, evaluating, and revising individual learning plans based upon personal needs analysis. These plans are appraised and reformulated as students gradually discover more about vocabulary learning strategies. The course culminates in two projects; one in which learners in pairs create authentic texts to demonstrate their ability to use vocabulary in context, and the other, in which they teach vocabulary learning strategies to a class of their peers. The presentation will not only explain ... more

Speaker: Steven Asquith

I am a senior lecturer at Kanda University of International Studies and co-editor of JALT The Language Teacher, My Share column. I am interested in training learners to be more ... more

11:15 Sat

Developing a Web Comic to Teach English #144

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 11:15-11:50 JST

Comics in Japan are a huge source of entertainment and a pop culture icon that people of all ages love, but comics are also often used to teach in Japan, including language. In 2019, as part of an attempt to serve students at our university with exciting and engaging original materials that they can use for free to learn English and rhetorical content, a yonkoma (or “four panel”) online comic was developed and posted on Instagram over the course of several months. This poster presentation will explore how that comic was developed, how it used language and rhetorical concepts, and how it targeted students.

Comics in Japan are a huge source of entertainment and a pop culture icon that people of all ages love, but comics are also often used to teach in Japan, including language. In 2019, as part of an attempt to serve students at our university with exciting and engaging original materials that they can use for free to learn English and rhetorical content, a yonkoma (or “four panel”) online comic was developed and posted on Instagram over the course of several months. This poster presentation will explore how that comic was developed, how it used language and rhetorical concepts, and ... more

11:15 Sat

Modals meet Medicine in a Roleplay #156

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 11:15-11:50 JST

Roleplay and simulation are considered effective teaching strategies not only in the realm of EFL (Winston, 2013; Chang, 2013; Piazzoli, 2011; Stinson & Freebody, 2010) but also in the field of medical, nursing, and care training (Gotwals & Yeager, 2014; Unsworth, Tuffnell & Platt, 2013; Hogan, Kapralos, Cristancho, Finney & Dubrowski, 2011). This presentation will explain how the presenter used roleplay in a General English course for students majoring in nursing. A review of the existing literature in this field will be followed by an explanation of the context of the course and the learning objectives of the activity. This will be followed by a step-by-step description of the procedure and the material used in the roleplay. The participants will also get an opportunity to participate in and get a hands-on experience of one of the roleplays mentioned in the presentation.

Roleplay and simulation are considered effective teaching strategies not only in the realm of EFL (Winston, 2013; Chang, 2013; Piazzoli, 2011; Stinson & Freebody, 2010) but also in the field of medical, nursing, and care training (Gotwals & Yeager, 2014; Unsworth, Tuffnell & Platt, 2013; Hogan, Kapralos, Cristancho, Finney & Dubrowski, 2011). This presentation will explain how the presenter used roleplay in a General English course for students majoring in nursing. A review of the existing literature in this field will be followed by an explanation of the context of the course and the learning objectives of the activity. This ... more

Speaker: Chhayankdhar Singh Rathore (CD)

Chhayankdhar Singh Rathore is an Assistant Lecturer at Soka University. He currently serves as the Publicity Chair of the Performance in Education (PIE) SIG. His areas of interest include performance ... more

11:15 Sat

Sponsored: Lexxica R&D WordEngine Forum #200

Sat, Jun 20, 11:15-11:50 JST

For new and experienced WordEngine users. All questions answered, all suggestions welcome.

For new and experienced WordEngine users. All questions answered, all suggestions welcome.

Host: Guy Cihi

EdTech Entrepreneur - Producer of WordEngine. Attention ER advocates: Use the free VCheck lexical test to ensure that your students are reading at the optimal level based on their ... more

12:00 Sat

Social annotation in the writing classroom #113

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:00-12:35 JST

Annotation, whether in the margins of a book or online text through the use of an online tool, is a social process mitigated by social structures. Learning happens within a specific context, and with the right tools, the text itself can be that context. This presentation will introduce social annotation as a learning tool for the writing classroom by describing a project implemented across two university writing courses. The project asked students to annotate online texts prior to using the texts as sources for summary/response essays. This session will be practice-oriented, but the presenter will mention this research project as an example of how social annotation might be used in the writing classroom. The presenter will discuss how social annotation on online texts has the potential to facilitate collaborative learning, community building, and enhanced reading comprehension. Attendees of this session will leave with a better understanding of what social annotation is, and they also have the chance to explore a social annotation tool and consider the affordances it may bring to their own teaching and learning contexts.

Annotation, whether in the margins of a book or online text through the use of an online tool, is a social process mitigated by social structures. Learning happens within a specific context, and with the right tools, the text itself can be that context. This presentation will introduce social annotation as a learning tool for the writing classroom by describing a project implemented across two university writing courses. The project asked students to annotate online texts prior to using the texts as sources for summary/response essays. This session will be practice-oriented, but the presenter will mention this research project as ... more

Speaker: Crystal Rose-Wainstock

@crosewainstock

Presentation Site -- https://sites.google.com/kanda.kuis.ac.jp/pansig2020/home

12:00 Sat

Pre/post study abroad learning in the local community #158

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:00-12:35 JST

Pre/post study abroad learning for college students does not have to limit itself to classrooms. Given the current situation in Japan, with an expanding foreign resident population, a new opportunity has presented itself: Language exchange between college students and foreign residents in the local community. A preliminary trial called Kokubunji Local has been conducted in Kokubunji, Tokyo. It is a weekly Japanese-English language exchange among people in the Kokubunji area that include college students. It has 37 members from 12 nations. There have been 24 meetings as of February 18th, 2020, with 7 participants for each meeting on average. One meeting usually lasts for 1 hour, half spent on English conversation, the other on Japanese conversation. Kokubunji Local provides college students with opportunities to have casual talks with the participants from diverse background, many of who speak fluent English. Students who plan to study abroad are especially benefited as foreign participants often talk about the cultural differences between Japan and their home countries. Students often realize that not only their English needs to be improved a lot prior to their study abroad but also they should bring conversation topics and entertain the participants. For students who have come back after study abroad, Kokubunji Local provides an opportunity to put their improved speaking skills into practice. A list of suggestions will be presented at the end of the presentation for a further trial at a bigger scale. These will include suggestions regarding how to draw participants, venue, time, facilitators, etc.

Pre/post study abroad learning for college students does not have to limit itself to classrooms. Given the current situation in Japan, with an expanding foreign resident population, a new opportunity has presented itself: Language exchange between college students and foreign residents in the local community. A preliminary trial called Kokubunji Local has been conducted in Kokubunji, Tokyo. It is a weekly Japanese-English language exchange among people in the Kokubunji area that include college students. It has 37 members from 12 nations. There have been 24 meetings as of February 18th, 2020, with 7 participants for each meeting on average. One ... more

Speaker: Kotaro Sato

Student of Tokyo Keizai University

Speaker: Toshiko Oda

Toshiko Oda is an associate professor of English and Linguistics at Tokyo Keizai University. She is a JALT SA SIG member. She has been involved in organizing SA programs at ... more

12:00 Sat

Electronic Projects using Breadboards #161

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:00-12:35 JST

This is a case study of a CLIL (content-language integrated learning) STEM (science technology engineering mathematics) task-based course for college freshmen majoring in technical fields such as engineering or science. Students build electronic circuits using breadboards and discrete components, and become able to explain in both L1 and L2 how to construct and operate the circuits. Our students have never done these tasks before. Our students are familiar with electronics theory but are unaware of actual circuits and components. For example, on an LED (light emitting diode) the positive (also called anode) lead is longer than the negative (also called cathode) lead. By learning how to identify components and build circuits, students balance their theoretical and practical knowledge. We provide assembly instructions in L1, and similar phrases in L2. After building, testing, and demonstrating kits to classmates, students write assembly instructions in L2. Much of the CLIL component of this course is in vocabulary. We expose students to both L1 and L2 because students need to become bilingual. Much of the STEM component is in practical electronics. Although our results are not necessarily generalizable, our experience may assist practitioners seeking course designs or teaching plans for CLIL and STEM.

This is a case study of a CLIL (content-language integrated learning) STEM (science technology engineering mathematics) task-based course for college freshmen majoring in technical fields such as engineering or science. Students build electronic circuits using breadboards and discrete components, and become able to explain in both L1 and L2 how to construct and operate the circuits. Our students have never done these tasks before. Our students are familiar with electronics theory but are unaware of actual circuits and components. For example, on an LED (light emitting diode) the positive (also called anode) lead is longer than the negative (also called ... more

Speaker: Goh Kawai

This is a poster presentation. Goh's website is http://goh.kawai.com/. Goh was until 2020-03-31 a professor of education engineering at Hokkaido University, Center for Language Learning. He now resides in Tokyo.

12:00 Sat

Perceptions of peer assessments of oral presentations #175

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:00-12:35 JST

As more and more EFL programs incorporate oral presentations into their curriculum, the time-consuming nature of presentations where one student presents while the rest of the class listens has necessitated experimentation with alternative formats in presentation procedures and assessment. Peer assessment is one way to help offset this downtime. As well as providing more formative feedback to the students, it is beneficial in focusing attention on those skills needed for making a presentation successful. This presentation will present the findings of a study examining the perceptions of Japanese university EFL students towards peer assessment of oral presentations. Quantitative data was obtained through the use of a survey adapted from Fazel (2015) administered two times to the same set of students; after one semester of instruction (n=19) and at the conclusion of the second semester (n=17). Additional qualitative data will be analyzed in the form of written comments provided by the students. Not surprisingly, the results indicate that the increased exposure allowed the students to developed stronger opinions as to the benefits of peer assessment in the oral presentation classroom. The findings will be discussed as well as considerations offered for future research.

As more and more EFL programs incorporate oral presentations into their curriculum, the time-consuming nature of presentations where one student presents while the rest of the class listens has necessitated experimentation with alternative formats in presentation procedures and assessment. Peer assessment is one way to help offset this downtime. As well as providing more formative feedback to the students, it is beneficial in focusing attention on those skills needed for making a presentation successful. This presentation will present the findings of a study examining the perceptions of Japanese university EFL students towards peer assessment of oral presentations. Quantitative data ... more

12:00 Sat

Stories that Motivate and Inspire #193

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:00-12:35 JST

The ability to create compelling narratives that inspire and promote cooperation is one of the most powerful tools humans possess. It is what makes us unique, allowing us to innovate, learn, survive and flourish. (Noah Yuval Harari, 2015). Storytelling is one of the fundamental elements of communication and learning. We are naturally able to process and apply stories to every aspect of our lives. Storytelling is an effective way to connect many people, allowing us to learn from things we have never experienced. Apart from knowledge and training, teachers possess their own personal and professional experiences or stories, applying these to language learning is of tremendous value to students. Everyone has a story to tell. Presenters will demonstrate how simple, concrete, and comprehensible narratives, critical incidents or experiences can be constructed and shared to help learners develop a deeper understanding of abstract and ambiguous aspects of language and culture. In conclusion, presenters will also discuss how a simple narrative framework can be applied to creating, teaching, or learning from stories. Examples, ranging from children’s books and popular films to keynote presentations and influential speeches, will show how good stories connect, motivate and inspire.

The ability to create compelling narratives that inspire and promote cooperation is one of the most powerful tools humans possess. It is what makes us unique, allowing us to innovate, learn, survive and flourish. (Noah Yuval Harari, 2015). Storytelling is one of the fundamental elements of communication and learning. We are naturally able to process and apply stories to every aspect of our lives. Storytelling is an effective way to connect many people, allowing us to learn from things we have never experienced. Apart from knowledge and training, teachers possess their own personal and professional experiences or stories, applying these ... more

Speaker: Andrew Reimann

I am from Vancouver, Canada and currently teach Communication at Aoyama Gakuin University. My background and research interests are in social linguistics, with emphasis on intercultural communication. Although English is ... more

Speaker: Natsuki Suzuki

Natsuki Suzuki is from Aichi and studies Early Childhood Education (MA) at Aoyama Gakuin University. She also teaches Elementary Schoolchildren and researches storytelling to teach, inspire and make children smile. ... more

12:00 Sat

CEFR–Talk – A CEFR & LP SIG Special PanSIG Online Forum #188

SIG Forum
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:00-13:20 JST

This Forum is an open CEFR – Talk. CEFR & LP SIG members and anyone who is interested in the CEFR, the CEFR/CV and related topics are kindly invited to this lunchtime talk on the CEFR. There are various topics to share: First is the new research project (Kaken) on “Language Education reform using action research: Consulting the CEFRs educational principles” 「アクションリサーチの手法を用いた言語教育改善: CEFRの教育理念を参考にして」. We are looking for people getting involved using the CEFR and doing action research. Second, the recent development in remote emergency teaching could be an incentive to do research on online teaching and the CEFR & CEFR/CV, discussing and adapting for example related ‘Can Do’ descriptors. Third, other fields were CEFR & CLIL (conference in October), CEFR & tasks for teaching/assessment, CEFR & mediation, ... As format for the forum this could be a general talk (all) or with breakout sessions (thematically). The new normal opens up different pathways. Looking forward meeting people interested in the CEFR! You are welcome!

This Forum is an open CEFR – Talk. CEFR & LP SIG members and anyone who is interested in the CEFR, the CEFR/CV and related topics are kindly invited to this lunchtime talk on the CEFR. There are various topics to share: First is the new research project (Kaken) on “Language Education reform using action research: Consulting the CEFRs educational principles” 「アクションリサーチの手法を用いた言語教育改善: CEFRの教育理念を参考にして」. We are looking for people getting involved using the CEFR and doing action research. Second, the recent development in remote emergency teaching could be an incentive to do research on online teaching and the CEFR & CEFR/CV, ... more

Speaker: Gabriela Schmidt

Coordinator of JALT CEFR & LP SIG

12:45 Sat

Barriers to ICT integration at a Japanese college #114

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:45-13:20 JST

The purpose of this qualitative action research study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of EFL university teachers in Eastern Japan in overcoming barriers to the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in their daily teaching practice. The problem addressed in this study was that universities in Japan are under pressure to align their curriculum with government initiatives that demand ICT integration, but governmental guidelines for faculty development across educational institutions have not been developed. The research setting was a liberal arts college in Eastern Japan. Purposeful sampling was used to attain a sample of 12 EFL university teachers. Cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) served as the theoretical framework. MAXQDA 12 software was used to identify codes, patterns, and themes across the collected data. The major themes included were (a) software was too difficult to use for teaching purposes and was a barrier to ICT integration and (b) faculty contemplation of learning objectives and learning outcomes informed decisions to integrate ICT successfully. Recommendations for educational leadership included creating a theoretically driven ICT training program tied to curriculum learning objectives and hiring educational technologists to provide “just-in-time” techno-pedagogical support.

The purpose of this qualitative action research study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of EFL university teachers in Eastern Japan in overcoming barriers to the integration of information and communication technology (ICT) in their daily teaching practice. The problem addressed in this study was that universities in Japan are under pressure to align their curriculum with government initiatives that demand ICT integration, but governmental guidelines for faculty development across educational institutions have not been developed. The research setting was a liberal arts college in Eastern Japan. Purposeful sampling was used to attain a sample of 12 EFL university ... more

Speaker: Dan Ferreira

Dan Ferreira, Ed.D., is a contract lecturer at Sophia University in downtown Tokyo and is a Google Certified Trainer and an Apple Teacher. He has been an educator for close ... more

12:45 Sat

Facilitating students' self-directed research #140

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:45-13:20 JST

In this practical presentation, the presenter will describe how Active Learning was introduced into a tertiary 1st and 2nd-year self-directed research and discussion course that centered on examining various global, political, and social issues. In the course, students worked individually on two research projects that were each completed over a 5-week period. After each period of research, students presented their findings to small groups in the form of a 12-15 minute presentation that included time for discussion. The presenter will describe how they scaffolded and facilitated the research process from the brainstorming to the presenting stage. In doing so, they will explain how research skills such as brainstorming, note-taking, and questioning were introduced to the students. As the presenter demonstrates each, he will provide examples and give advice that can be applied and adapted to other classrooms. In closing, the presenter will share some of the student reflections he collected at the end of the course.

In this practical presentation, the presenter will describe how Active Learning was introduced into a tertiary 1st and 2nd-year self-directed research and discussion course that centered on examining various global, political, and social issues. In the course, students worked individually on two research projects that were each completed over a 5-week period. After each period of research, students presented their findings to small groups in the form of a 12-15 minute presentation that included time for discussion. The presenter will describe how they scaffolded and facilitated the research process from the brainstorming to the presenting stage. In doing so, they ... more

Speaker: James Underwood

I have taught English in Japan in a variety of contexts since 2005. I completed my Masters in Applied Linguistics and TESOL in 2009. I now teach as a part ... more

12:45 Sat

Pre-departure orientation for study in the U.K. #159

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:45-13:20 JST

Despite the importance of pre-departure orientations that focus on the culture and language of the host country where students study abroad, it appears that pre-departure orientations provided by many Japanese universities are limited to the basics, such as travel logistics and health and safety issues. Consequently, students could end up regarding studying abroad as merely traveling, rather than as educational opportunities. The purpose of this presentation, therefore, is to explore how pre-departure orientations that focus on the target culture and language would benefit students planning to study abroad. As an English teacher at a university in Japan, I developed a pre-departure orientation intended for university students planning to attend a two-week general English language course in the U.K. to help them understand British culture and improve English before studying abroad; and I conducted a qualitative case study to investigate participants’ perceptions of the newly developed pre-departure orientation to understand whether the orientation benefited students from studying abroad perspectives. I believe that the presentation will help you understand the benefits of pre-departure orientations that focus on the culture and language of the host country.

Despite the importance of pre-departure orientations that focus on the culture and language of the host country where students study abroad, it appears that pre-departure orientations provided by many Japanese universities are limited to the basics, such as travel logistics and health and safety issues. Consequently, students could end up regarding studying abroad as merely traveling, rather than as educational opportunities. The purpose of this presentation, therefore, is to explore how pre-departure orientations that focus on the target culture and language would benefit students planning to study abroad. As an English teacher at a university in Japan, I developed a ... more

Speaker: Nobue Inoue

Nobue Inoue is a senior lecturer at a private university in Japan. Her study abroad experiences encouraged her to pursue an academic career and she has been developing study abroad ... more

12:45 Sat

Transferable skills via progressive PBL #162

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:45-13:20 JST

Are you adequately preparing your students for success outside of the language classroom? We asked ourselves this same question. In a one-year elective class aimed at developing professional skills, the educators aspired to facilitate university students’ abilities to excel in all classes and to become better prospective employees. By the end of each semester, students were tasked with creating projects that would require knowledge, research tools, and a number of technical skills. The hurdle was high and intimidating. However, by employing a progressive approach to project based learning (PBL), students learned skills in earlier projects that could transfer not only to the final projects, but also to other courses and employment options. Students themselves remarked on the progress that they were making and their abilities to apply what they had learned earlier to what was to come later. This presentation will share ideas behind the conceptualization of the class, data from what students learned in terms of skills and language, share student reactions and advice for improving the course, and help attendees to conceive of their own progressive PBL courses.

Are you adequately preparing your students for success outside of the language classroom? We asked ourselves this same question. In a one-year elective class aimed at developing professional skills, the educators aspired to facilitate university students’ abilities to excel in all classes and to become better prospective employees. By the end of each semester, students were tasked with creating projects that would require knowledge, research tools, and a number of technical skills. The hurdle was high and intimidating. However, by employing a progressive approach to project based learning (PBL), students learned skills in earlier projects that could transfer not only ... more

Speaker: Manna Aoki

Manna Aoki belongs to English Education Development Center at Toyo Gakuen University. Her research interests includes motivation, willingness to communicate, cross cultural communication and material development.

Speaker: Jason Pratt

Jason Pratt is an Associate Professor at Yamanashi Prefectural University and a graduate of Hosei University in Tokyo. He runs a wildly popular seminar on how we can contribute locally ... more

12:45 Sat

Redefining accessibility in language learning #170

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:45-13:20 JST

Teachers are having to consider an increasing range of learner needs as learning environments become more diverse. Learners with special needs are one example. According to JASSO (2019), the percentage of students with disabilities in post-secondary education has increased from 0.44% to 1.05% since 2014. However, only 28% of university language classes offer support for students with disabilities (Tonooka, 2015). The Act for Eliminating Discrimination against Persons with Disabilities requires teachers to provide reasonable accommodation for learners with special needs. This change reflects shifting of the notion of disability from impairment to inaccessibility to learning resources. It is essential that language teachers consider how they can redefine the notion of accessibility in language learning in order to improve overall learning experiences. This poster session highlights various learner needs that are prevalent in language classes. These include communicative, physiological, psychological, social, and cognitive differences. Presenters will share their insights into developing accessible learning. There is no “one-size-fits-all” pedagogy for language learning. The goal of this session is to facilitate discussions on raising awareness, improving accessibility, and considering how teachers can best support learners with special needs. Participants are welcome to share their classroom stories concerning accessibility in language learning.

Teachers are having to consider an increasing range of learner needs as learning environments become more diverse. Learners with special needs are one example. According to JASSO (2019), the percentage of students with disabilities in post-secondary education has increased from 0.44% to 1.05% since 2014. However, only 28% of university language classes offer support for students with disabilities (Tonooka, 2015). The Act for Eliminating Discrimination against Persons with Disabilities requires teachers to provide reasonable accommodation for learners with special needs. This change reflects shifting of the notion of disability from impairment to inaccessibility to learning resources. It is essential that ... more

Speaker: Ryoko Sato

I am a lecturer of the Faculty of Foreign Studies at Reitaku University. My research interests: Universal Design for foreign language learning/teaching focusing on specific learning differences, Working Memory and ... more

Speaker: Andrew Reimann

I am from Vancouver, Canada and currently teach Communication at Aoyama Gakuin University. My background and research interests are in social linguistics, with emphasis on intercultural communication. Although English is ... more

Speaker: Ryota Moriya

I currently teach English at Otaru University of Commerce. My background is in Disability Studies and Comparative Culture Studies. My research interests include color-blindness, disability studies, accessibility in language learning, ... more

12:45 Sat

Emergent forms of peer feedback for L2 writers by design #176

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 12:45-13:20 JST

Peer feedback within writing instruction can help L2 writers understand the needs of readers. This presentation details a novel use of Rasch measurement and an anonymized judging plan to enhance qualitative and quantitative feedback for L2 learners in a writing course. While typically used for research purposes, these tools are used here by a writing instructor and the procedure is kept simple for the students. The presentation provides the conceptual backing for design choices, a general overview of the procedure, and the results of an initial trial run with 16 high-proficiency learners of English. Anonymity is used to create a space for learners to give constructive feedback. A judging plan allows for varied sources of qualitative comments for each essay. Together with Rasch measurement, it also allows for group-wide measures of both rating behavior and the rated essays without asking students to rate all writing samples from a class. The primary aim is to illicit diverging forms of feedback that require each learner to make interpretations. Finally, the learners write reflection papers on the experience. This peer evaluation design ensures privacy, diverse forms of feedback, reliable scoring, and manageable workloads. An exit survey from the trial run indicated that unique insights emerged for the participants about how different readers can receive writing in different ways.

Peer feedback within writing instruction can help L2 writers understand the needs of readers. This presentation details a novel use of Rasch measurement and an anonymized judging plan to enhance qualitative and quantitative feedback for L2 learners in a writing course. While typically used for research purposes, these tools are used here by a writing instructor and the procedure is kept simple for the students. The presentation provides the conceptual backing for design choices, a general overview of the procedure, and the results of an initial trial run with 16 high-proficiency learners of English. Anonymity is used to create a ... more

Speaker: Jeffrey Martin

Jeffrey Martin is a lecturer at two universities in the Kanto area. His interests include English for business and other specific purposes, task-based language teaching, learning strategies, and assessment. (jeffmjp@gmail.com)

13:30 Sat

Multimedia principles for slide data graphics #119

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 13:30-14:05 JST

Since the publication of Garr Reynold’s Presentation Zen (2008), many educators have become persuaded that text-heavy slides are neither attractive or effective supplements to their message, but instead, lead to the dreaded "death by PowerPoint". As a result, many of these educators have reduced the amount of text on their slides and have taught their students to do the same. However, many people are unaware of the theory and research that support this approach. Some even scoff at the need to invest much time in preparing slides. Moreover, others lack the confidence to prepare data visuals that are both effective and attractive. Research by Mayer (2001, 2009) demonstrates that reducing text on the screen in oral presentations is supported by the evidence for increasing learning, Mayer’s cognitive theory of multimedia learning and its principles provide the framework from which to produce visuals that are more pedagogically sound.

This workshop will provide a brief summary of the research and will demonstrate practical steps for producing improved data visuals to support the message of the speaker and will also give suggestions for teaching students. Participants will be able to ask questions and share their own experiences and suggestions.

Since the publication of Garr Reynold’s Presentation Zen (2008), many educators have become persuaded that text-heavy slides are neither attractive or effective supplements to their message, but instead, lead to the dreaded "death by PowerPoint". As a result, many of these educators have reduced the amount of text on their slides and have taught their students to do the same. However, many people are unaware of the theory and research that support this approach. Some even scoff at the need to invest much time in preparing slides. Moreover, others lack the confidence to prepare data visuals that are both effective ... more

Speaker: Daniel Beck

University instructor at Rikkyo University, Ed.D student at Anaheim University. Presentations and CALL enthusiasts. Husband, church elder, and sports fan (Dodgers, Lakers, Cowboys).

13:30 Sat

Events to support interaction in a learning space #141

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 13:30-14:05 JST

This presentation addresses the facilitation of students' using a devoted English speaking area within a multilingual self-access center (SAC) at a private Japanese university. When the current SAC facility opened, the need for L2 social interaction became apparent, prompting the creation of the speaking area. Observation and previous research indicated, however, that further support for increasing English use was needed. Therefore, interventions to promote student L2 interaction were held; these included regular events for speaking practice or collaborative learning led by SAC student staff, with support from SAC faculty (the presenters). The presenters are conducting ongoing research on these events, focusing on reflection by learners and student staff on effective support and environments for L2 speaking, as well as beliefs about their own language use. Initial findings, based on qualitative data from an online post-event questionnaire and subsequent interviews, are presented, along with their implications for learners’ autonomous language use outside of class. The presenters also share their reflections on their support of learners and the potential effects on both event participants and leaders. Finally, practical suggestions are provided for practitioners interested in nurturing L2 use beyond the classroom, fostering students’ agency in supporting peers, and keeping such support sustainable.

This presentation addresses the facilitation of students' using a devoted English speaking area within a multilingual self-access center (SAC) at a private Japanese university. When the current SAC facility opened, the need for L2 social interaction became apparent, prompting the creation of the speaking area. Observation and previous research indicated, however, that further support for increasing English use was needed. Therefore, interventions to promote student L2 interaction were held; these included regular events for speaking practice or collaborative learning led by SAC student staff, with support from SAC faculty (the presenters). The presenters are conducting ongoing research on these events, ... more

Speaker: Yuri Imamura

Yuri Imamura is a learning advisor in the Self-Access Learning Center at Kanda University of International Studies in Japan. She completed her MA in TEFL at the University of Birmingham, ... more

Speaker: Isra Wongsarnpigoon

Isra Wongsarnpigoon is a Learning Advisor at the Self-Access Learning Center at Kanda University of International Studies. He holds an M.S.Ed from Temple University, Japan Campus. His interests include learner ... more

13:30 Sat

Short-term study abroad = tourist training? #160

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 13:30-14:05 JST

Short-term Study Abroad programmes organised for Japanese university students are becoming increasingly common. However, the presenter’s experience of organizing and accompanying such programmes over the last twenty years suggests that there is a risk that short-term programmes may dilute the SA experience so that it is no longer recognisably educational. With shopping to be done, sights to be seen, photos to be taken, and social media to be updated constantly, there is little time to learn anything about the local cultural environment or the language(s) spoken.

The presenter will suggest that there is a real danger that these programmes will function simply as training in how to be a tourist. Students learn to be consumers of experiences, to glide over problems and learning opportunities, and to package and label experiences so they have none of the life-changing, perspective-twisting consequences educators associate with SA.

However, he will further suggest that training students to be (responsible, thoughtful) tourists is exactly what we should be doing. Tourism, domestic or foreign, is likely to be in their future: if we can equip them to reflect on and learn from their tourist experiences, we are fulfilling our role as international educators. Drawing on Kolb’s (1984) model of experiential learning, Bennett’s (2012) three paradigms of intercultural learning, and recent findings from neuroscience and cognition, he will propose practical, field-tested activities that both encourage reflection during Study Abroa, and set habits that will enrich any future touristic visits with the potential for cross-cultural learning.

Short-term Study Abroad programmes organised for Japanese university students are becoming increasingly common. However, the presenter’s experience of organizing and accompanying such programmes over the last twenty years suggests that there is a risk that short-term programmes may dilute the SA experience so that it is no longer recognisably educational. With shopping to be done, sights to be seen, photos to be taken, and social media to be updated constantly, there is little time to learn anything about the local cultural environment or the language(s) spoken.

The presenter will suggest that there is a real danger that these programmes will function ... more

Speaker: Stephen M. Ryan

Stephen M. Ryan teaches and runs short-term Study Abroad programmes at Sanyo Gakuen University, in Okayama.

13:30 Sat

Performance in Education #155

SIG Forum
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 13:30-14:50 JST

The Performance in Education (PIE) SIG Forum will be a panel discussion on the various facets of Performance in Education. The panellists will discuss topics such as their reasons for choosing a performance-assisted or performance-based pedagogy, some examples of successful classroom activities, potential challenges in using these activities, tips for beginners, and their thoughts on performance in education in the time of Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) during the current COVID-19 pandemic. The panel will feature PIE practitioners who specialize in various genres of PIE activities such as roleplay, improvisation, public speaking, debate, discussion, process drama, readers theatre, living newspapers, oral interpretation, radio drama, radio show, film, music and rap, and kamishibai.

The Performance in Education (PIE) SIG Forum will be a panel discussion on the various facets of Performance in Education. The panellists will discuss topics such as their reasons for choosing a performance-assisted or performance-based pedagogy, some examples of successful classroom activities, potential challenges in using these activities, tips for beginners, and their thoughts on performance in education in the time of Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) during the current COVID-19 pandemic. The panel will feature PIE practitioners who specialize in various genres of PIE activities such as roleplay, improvisation, public speaking, debate, discussion, process drama, readers theatre, living newspapers, oral ... more

Speaker: E Von Wong

E Von Wong is an assistant lecturer at Soka University. Her research areas of interest include public speaking, oral presentation, and drama in ELT. Coming from an ESL background, public ... more

Speaker: Eucharia Donnery

After graduating with a PhD in Drama and Theatre Studies from the National University College of Ireland (NUI) in 2013, Eucharia Donnery currently works as a drama practitioner and computer-assisted ... more

Speaker: Ashley Ford

Ashley Ford is a language lecturer at Nagoya City University in Nagoya, Japan. Her areas of interest include Creative Project-Based Learning and Performance in Education, especially through film-making and music ... more

Speaker: 斉木ゆかり

I am teaching at Tokai University. I organize ”Minna no Impro“ in Yamanashi lifelong learning. She loves Shigin, tea ceremony and making games.

Speaker: Chelsea Schwartz

I have been teaching in Japan for the past 6 years. Currently, I work for the FILA department at Juntendo University. I have previously worked as an assistant lecturer at ... more

Speaker: George MacLean

George MacLean is a professor at the University of the Ryukyus. He has taught at primary-junior high and university levels in Japan and in the International School system. His research ... more

Speaker: Chhayankdhar Singh Rathore (CD)

Chhayankdhar Singh Rathore is an Assistant Lecturer at Soka University. He currently serves as the Publicity Chair of the Performance in Education (PIE) SIG. His areas of interest include performance ... more

Speaker: David Kluge

David Kluge (Professor, Nanzan University) has been teaching English in Japan for 35 years. He is a founding officer of the CALL SIG and founding coordinator of the Performance in ... more

Speaker: Gordon Rees

Gordon Rees is an associate professor at Yokkaichi University in Mie Prefecture. He is also the Coordinator of the Performance in Education (PIE) SIG. Currently, he is doing research ... more

Speaker: Vivian Bussinguer-Khavari

Vivian Bussinguer-Khavari is an associate professor at Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo. She has a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics and her research interests include Performance in Education (PIE), Heritage Language ... more

14:15 Sat

Learners’ Voices in English Classes with EdTech #110

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 14:15-14:50 JST

Both of MEXT(2018) and METI(2018) have been emphasizing the importance of integrating technology into education, so called EdTech. In English classes at university, students are also expected to use EdTech to enhance their learning effectively in this digitalized and global society. In this presentation, I will talk about one four skill-integrated English course at a university with the policy of BYOD in which a learning management system(LMS) called Manaba is used for flipped learning of grammar, group work of making a presentation, and peer evaluation of writing. The use of EdTech is expected to promote students’ active, adaptive, cooperative, and self-regulated learning. However, it will be important to investigate how students as active agents in English classes with EdTech perceive effects of EdTech. Regarding the use of EdTech into English classes, I will discuss results of a questionnaire survey from students and interviews with students and make pedagogical implications about how to use technology effectively in English classes taking students’ perception into consideration. As a final remark, I will propose how English teachers can help students acquire English and use technology, both of which are important skills in the 21st century, in English classes.

Both of MEXT(2018) and METI(2018) have been emphasizing the importance of integrating technology into education, so called EdTech. In English classes at university, students are also expected to use EdTech to enhance their learning effectively in this digitalized and global society. In this presentation, I will talk about one four skill-integrated English course at a university with the policy of BYOD in which a learning management system(LMS) called Manaba is used for flipped learning of grammar, group work of making a presentation, and peer evaluation of writing. The use of EdTech is expected to promote students’ active, adaptive, cooperative, and ... more

Speaker: Yukie Saito

I obtained MA in TESOL from Teachers College of Columbia University and is pursuing PhD. from Temple University. I work at a private university in Tokyo. My research areas are ... more

14:15 Sat

Teacher-student conferences about essay writing #135

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 14:15-14:50 JST

Teacher-student conferences (TSC) about essay writing can help students to raise their awareness of their strengths and weaknesses and revise their essays. However, few studies on the effect on learner autonomy (LA) to develop their writing skills have been conducted in Japan. Therefore, the present study aims to explore the influences of TSC on LA and students’ writing strategy use. An illustrative case study was administered with six 2nd-year university students in central Japan for 3 months. For this, data was collected through classroom observation notes, interviews, and the target students' learning logs. Using inductive thematic analysis, the researcher coded the data and categorized it into three groups: the use of secondary references, the use of a grammar reference book, and collaborative writing activities. Data illustrated that students still needed the teacher to judge whether their writing strategies were appropriate; however, the more actively students were engaged in conferences, the more revisions they conducted while utilising more writing strategies. Therefore, this study attests to the claim that teachers and students can collaboratively explore ways for students to revise their papers by themselves (Hirvela & Belcher, 2018). Accordingly, TSC will contribute to writing instructions and LA in EFL tertiary educational contexts.

Teacher-student conferences (TSC) about essay writing can help students to raise their awareness of their strengths and weaknesses and revise their essays. However, few studies on the effect on learner autonomy (LA) to develop their writing skills have been conducted in Japan. Therefore, the present study aims to explore the influences of TSC on LA and students’ writing strategy use. An illustrative case study was administered with six 2nd-year university students in central Japan for 3 months. For this, data was collected through classroom observation notes, interviews, and the target students' learning logs. Using inductive thematic analysis, the researcher coded the ... more

Speaker: Naoya Shibata

Naoya SHIBATA is currently teaching part-time at Nagoya University of Foreign Studies, Nanzan University, Nagoya Women's University, and Nagoya University while studying at the doctoral course, Anaheim University. He researches ... more

14:15 Sat

Cognitive influence of food and taste terminology #145

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 14:15-14:50 JST

In this study, the researcher investigated the cognitive and cross-linguistic influence of food and taste terminology in Japanese adult learners of English and how it affects language learning. The researcher investigated if Japanese adult learners of English think differently to native English speakers about the taste of food and if different features of language such as ideophones and metaphor affect cognition. The researcher used the domain of food to conduct two cross-sectional experiments on sixteen Japanese English learners and sixteen native English-speaking participants with similar variables using quantitative and qualitative methods. This study builds on research from previous studies and works by O'Mahony and Isshi (1986), Backhouse (1994), Deignan (1997), Cook (2010), and Littlemore (2015). The experiments carried out in this study established a number of findings that suggest that the language features of food and taste terminology affect cognition and identified several differences in the way the two groups think about food including variances in schematic mental associations. The results also highlighted the need for teaching materials to be developed to enable teachers to focus of figurative speech, metaphor interpretation and other cross-linguistic influences. These teaching materials could be incorporated into upper intermediate and advanced level curriculums for adult learners to improve the developing language competence.

In this study, the researcher investigated the cognitive and cross-linguistic influence of food and taste terminology in Japanese adult learners of English and how it affects language learning. The researcher investigated if Japanese adult learners of English think differently to native English speakers about the taste of food and if different features of language such as ideophones and metaphor affect cognition. The researcher used the domain of food to conduct two cross-sectional experiments on sixteen Japanese English learners and sixteen native English-speaking participants with similar variables using quantitative and qualitative methods. This study builds on research from previous studies ... more

Speaker: James Broxholme

James Broxholme is a part-time university lecturer and English language school owner based in Kagawa, Japan. He has an MA in Applied Linguistics from the University of Birmingham and is ... more

14:15 Sat

Study abroad: Interest, preferences and awareness #199

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 14:15-15:05 JST

There has been an increased focus in Japan on the importance of studying abroad and the role such programs play in the internationalization of universities and the making of human resources able to play an active in a global community. The purpose of this study was to examine (a) student interest levels in studying abroad, (b) student perceptions and preferences relating to studying abroad, (c) student awareness of opportunities made available by universities, and (d) the influence of specific study abroad marketing materials. The study involved 64 (61% male and 39% female) first and second-year students from various majors studying in a compulsory English language program at a private university in southwest Japan. The English proficiency of the participants on the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages) ranged from elementary level A2 to upper-intermediate level B2. Participant online surveys included four items measuring student interest levels in studying abroad and open-ended questions relating to student preferences, perceptions, and awareness of study abroad programs. The findings from this study indicate that the majority of participants (61%) did want to study abroad; however, preferences, intent levels, and program awareness varied based on academic major and year. Participants (39%) that did not want to study abroad frequently noted the financial costs associated with studying abroad. Implications of these findings and related factors regarding studying abroad programs for university students and administrators will be discussed. Suggestions will be made concerning the promotion of study abroad programs in order to better raise awareness.

There has been an increased focus in Japan on the importance of studying abroad and the role such programs play in the internationalization of universities and the making of human resources able to play an active in a global community. The purpose of this study was to examine (a) student interest levels in studying abroad, (b) student perceptions and preferences relating to studying abroad, (c) student awareness of opportunities made available by universities, and (d) the influence of specific study abroad marketing materials. The study involved 64 (61% male and 39% female) first and second-year students from various majors studying ... more

Speaker: Andrew Thompson

Andrew THOMPSON is a university lecturer and English language teaching (ELT) professional based in Kyushu, Japan. He currently is a lecturer and researcher at Fukuoka Women’s University in Fukuoka. He has an ... more

15:00 Sat

Homo Docens: Lessons From Brain Science About Effective Teaching #182

Plenary Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 15:00-16:00 JST

The official scientific name for our species is homo sapiens (wise human), but evolutionary scientists and neuroscientists suggest that a more accurate description is homo docens (the species that teaches itself). Why? Well, although learning is universally widespread in the animal world, ours is the only species that actively teaches its offspring (Högberg, Gärdenfors & Lars Larsson, 2015; Dehaene, 2020). This presentation will draw mainly on the work of Stanislas Dehaene to explain four basic principles that lead to effective learning and the neuroscience behind each one. These principles are: 1) Help learners direct and focus their attention; 2) Foster active engagement with the subject matter under investigation; 3) Provide constructive error feedback that guides learning and does not evaluate the learner; 4) Create opportunities for consolidation of learning through regular practice and skill building activities that enable subconscious mastery of what is being learned. Examples of class activities for a variety of levels of English learners will be provided to illustrate each of these principles and it is hoped that participants in the follow-up Q & A discussion will share many more examples of their own.

The official scientific name for our species is homo sapiens (wise human), but evolutionary scientists and neuroscientists suggest that a more accurate description is homo docens (the species that teaches itself). Why? Well, although learning is universally widespread in the animal world, ours is the only species that actively teaches its offspring (Högberg, Gärdenfors & Lars Larsson, 2015; Dehaene, 2020). This presentation will draw mainly on the work of Stanislas Dehaene to explain four basic principles that lead to effective learning and the neuroscience behind each one. These principles are: 1) Help learners direct and focus their attention; 2) Foster ... more

Speaker: Amanda Gillis Furutaka

Amanda Gillis-Furutaka is a professor in the Faculty of Foreign Studies at Kyoto Sangyo University, where she has worked since 1992. Before coming to Japan, she taught English in France, ... more

16:00 Sat

Listen and Repeat Sentences on YouTube #117

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:00-16:35 JST

This poster session will introduce videos found at youtube.com/InterestingThingsESL that students can use to practice intonation, rhythm and pronunciation. This site features various video series such as the 465 videos covering over 20,000 sentences using the wildcard name "Tom," a series of 48 videos covering over 2,900 sentences starting with "I don't," a series of 80 videos covering over 2,400 sentences beginning with "You're," and a series of videos focusing on /t/ & /b/ linking in sentences. There is also a series of videos with sentences using the language name wildcard "French," some videos for listening to and repeating irregular verbs, and several other series.

Many of these videos use sentences from the Tatoeba Corpus (tatoeba.org), which is a multilingual corpus of sentences in many languages and their translations. It is possible for students to find translations for many of the sentences in these videos. They can also volunteer to add translations in their native language for sentences that do not yet have translations.

This poster session will introduce videos found at youtube.com/InterestingThingsESL that students can use to practice intonation, rhythm and pronunciation. This site features various video series such as the 465 videos covering over 20,000 sentences using the wildcard name "Tom," a series of 48 videos covering over 2,900 sentences starting with "I don't," a series of 80 videos covering over 2,400 sentences beginning with "You're," and a series of videos focusing on /t/ & /b/ linking in sentences. There is also a series of videos with sentences using the language name wildcard "French," some videos for listening to and repeating ... more

Speaker: Charles Kelly

http://youtube.com/InterestingThingsESL

16:00 Sat

Self-disclosure: A window on the mind of teachers #146

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:00-16:35 JST

While the efficiency of subjective reporting and qualitative data, both solicited and unsolicited has come in and out of fashion since its inception (Hyers, 2018), such techniques promote a sensitive understanding of the particularities and conditions of individual lives. In this paper, three intimate teacher’s case studies will be reported. Self-compassion, self-care techniques, and even self-compassion fatigue were drawn from narrative group work, eight-week meditation, self-led mindfulness, and solicited diaries to enhance teachers' overall psychological and emotional wellbeing. Through the case studies of non-Japanese English teachers based in Tokyo, the presence of ongoing workplace stressors and lifestyle adjustments that impact teachers’ professional performance and private life satisfaction are identified. Based on the result of the narrative self-disclosure, one of the participants revealed that despite the pressure on her jobs such as a limited source of teaching materials, language barrier, and teaching in different schools, at least four schools, in a day made her psychologically, and physically exhausted. Being connected with her colleagues, frequent communication with her family, and self-meditation helped her to embrace her current situation positively. In addition, the benefits and associated challenges of using self-compassion techniques and mindfulness with education professionals are proven to be effective.

While the efficiency of subjective reporting and qualitative data, both solicited and unsolicited has come in and out of fashion since its inception (Hyers, 2018), such techniques promote a sensitive understanding of the particularities and conditions of individual lives. In this paper, three intimate teacher’s case studies will be reported. Self-compassion, self-care techniques, and even self-compassion fatigue were drawn from narrative group work, eight-week meditation, self-led mindfulness, and solicited diaries to enhance teachers' overall psychological and emotional wellbeing. Through the case studies of non-Japanese English teachers based in Tokyo, the presence of ongoing workplace stressors and lifestyle adjustments that impact ... more

Speaker: Merissa Braza Ocampo

I'm affiliated at Fukushima Gakuin University, Fukushima City. I finished my PhD in Hokkaido University, Japan and focused my research on promotion of Mother and Child Health (MCH) care. As ... more

16:00 Sat

Pragmatics & Business Communication SIG Forum #157

SIG Forum
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:00-17:20 JST

Pragmatics issues in ELF/BELF: Views from a Business English perspective. Business English training in Japan has traditionally been pragmatics-oriented compared with ELT (English Language Teaching) at university and especially in secondary education which has often remained language-focused and accuracy-obsessed. This reflects a BE (Business English) training priority on communicative effectiveness demanded by human resource departments and employees with real work needs. However, like language in other ELT contexts, the pragmatics of BE training has been dominated by native speaker norms. The recent interest in ELF/BELF challenges this dominance. What might it mean for BE pragmatics if BE loses the native speaker orientation? Whose pragmatics should be taught instead? The speakers in this forum will draw on their history of teaching BE in both company training and in university classes and will discuss the issues and possibilities. The audience will be encouraged to join in the discussion.

Pragmatics issues in ELF/BELF: Views from a Business English perspective. Business English training in Japan has traditionally been pragmatics-oriented compared with ELT (English Language Teaching) at university and especially in secondary education which has often remained language-focused and accuracy-obsessed. This reflects a BE (Business English) training priority on communicative effectiveness demanded by human resource departments and employees with real work needs. However, like language in other ELT contexts, the pragmatics of BE training has been dominated by native speaker norms. The recent interest in ELF/BELF challenges this dominance. What might it mean for BE pragmatics if BE loses the ... more

Speaker: Josef Williamson

Josef Williamson is a lecturer in business English at Daito Bunka University and the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo, Japan. In addition, he has been a corporate ... more

16:00 Sat

LD SIG Forum: Interacting with active learning #197

SIG Forum
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:00-18:05 JST

Recently active learning has become a buzzword in education in Japan. This interactive forum will open with a discussion questioning what active learning can add to the EFL classroom. Next, it will describe a self-directed student research project--based on concepts of active learning--in which students researched and presented on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The forum will end with a workshop showing how to apply Mind, Brain, and Education Science to active learning. This will introduce 7 neuro-ELT practices adaptable for materials and coursebooks to engage learners and guide active learning across a range of language skills. Throughout, participants are invited to question and discuss the ideas presented.

Greg Rouault

This interactive presentation is based on the research into Mind, Brain, and Education Science (MBE) by Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa (2010a, 2010b, 2014). At the intersection of neuroscience, education, and psychology, MBE presents a scientifically-grounded approach for improved teaching and learning. Drawing from what is known about the brain while also debunking neuromyths, this workshop introduces 7 neuro-ELT practices adaptable for materials and coursebooks to engage learners and guide active learning across a range of language skills.

James Underwood

This presentation will report on how the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) can be incorporated into the classroom. Over the course of 5 weeks students selected a SDG as the focus for a self-directed research project. Each week they researched their SDG and made 2 pages of notes and shared these notes in class. At the end of the project cycle each student formally presented their findings and lead a discussion on the SDG. After their presentation they reflected on the development of their content knowledge and language skills.

Recently active learning has become a buzzword in education in Japan. This interactive forum will open with a discussion questioning what active learning can add to the EFL classroom. Next, it will describe a self-directed student research project--based on concepts of active learning--in which students researched and presented on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The forum will end with a workshop showing how to apply Mind, Brain, and Education Science to active learning. This will introduce 7 neuro-ELT practices adaptable for materials and coursebooks to engage learners and guide active learning across a range of language skills. Throughout, participants ... more

Speaker: James Underwood

I have taught English in Japan in a variety of contexts since 2005. I completed my Masters in Applied Linguistics and TESOL in 2009. I now teach as a part ... more

Speaker: Greg Rouault

I have been teaching English as a foreign language in Japan since 1999. In higher education, I have taught 4 skills, study abroad test prep, EAP, and content-based courses with ... more

Moderator: Robert Morel

16:00 Sat

The Conference lobby #209

Open Space
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:00-18:30 JST

Between the plenary and keynote

Between the plenary and keynote

Host: Dawn Lucovich

PanSIG Virtual Conference Committee Chair / The University of Nagano, Assistant Professor / Nagano JALT, President

16:45 Sat

Positive conversations in the EFL classroom #147

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:45-17:20 JST

Positive psychology in education has gained attention recently for its potential to enrich the foreign language classroom. With a focus on improving well-being, positive psychology is a natural fit for language learning. One way to think about positive classroom activities is with the PERMA model. Each of the five letters of “PERMA” stand for a different component that can be used to think about well-being and happiness. Teachers of foreign languages, though they may not be conscious of it, probably already include positive activities in their lessons. For example, Positive emotions are present when we attempt to make classroom experiences enjoyable, and we often encourage our students to reflect on their Achievements. These two elements can be included in guided conversation activities and can serve as an effective way to bring positive psychology into classroom activities. By suggesting topics and providing vocabulary and phrases rooted in positive psychology, we can make these activities meaningful for students. However, it is important to consider if students will “pick up” on our intention of making activities positive. Students (n=109) were surveyed to investigate their preference for using conversation starters rooted in positive psychology. This poster will share the results and also how guided conversation activities (including starting questions, vocabulary, and strategies) can be framed in such a way as to incorporate aspects of positive psychology.

Positive psychology in education has gained attention recently for its potential to enrich the foreign language classroom. With a focus on improving well-being, positive psychology is a natural fit for language learning. One way to think about positive classroom activities is with the PERMA model. Each of the five letters of “PERMA” stand for a different component that can be used to think about well-being and happiness. Teachers of foreign languages, though they may not be conscious of it, probably already include positive activities in their lessons. For example, Positive emotions are present when we attempt to make classroom experiences ... more

Speaker: Brent Wright

I primarily teach Business Communication. My research interests include positive psychology in EFL, vocabulary acquisition, and CALL. I also love all (most) things jazz.

16:45 Sat

Mending Inadequacies of 2FL Textbooks in Japan #189

Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:45-17:20 JST

Despite manifold advances in foreign language teaching materials, textbooks often lag behind and teach inappropriate language or use outdated approaches. This presentation is an attempt at a simple systematization of some of these issues. The audience is made aware of the differences and provided with methods for reducing them. This presentation takes beginners’ courses of German as an example and compares relevant parts of recent Japanese-German textbooks with corresponding parts in the presenter’s approach. The following issues will be addressed: - Limits of literal repetition of sentence parts, - Excessive/superfluous explicitness in German, - Lack of variations where these are preferred, - Sacrificing the target language for teaching traditions and learner convenience, - Lacking linguistic analysis leading to (at best) funny and ironic scenes, and - Overemphasis on grammar where simplicity would serve the learners. Solutions to the issues addressed will be proposed from the presenter’s approach and the audience will be encouraged to look for their own solutions to related issues.

Despite manifold advances in foreign language teaching materials, textbooks often lag behind and teach inappropriate language or use outdated approaches. This presentation is an attempt at a simple systematization of some of these issues. The audience is made aware of the differences and provided with methods for reducing them. This presentation takes beginners’ courses of German as an example and compares relevant parts of recent Japanese-German textbooks with corresponding parts in the presenter’s approach. The following issues will be addressed: - Limits of literal repetition of sentence parts, - Excessive/superfluous explicitness in German, - Lack of variations where these are ... more

Speaker: Rudolf Reinelt

Teaching German on all levels and researching on how to do this better

16:45 Sat

Bilingualism SIG Forum #98

SIG Forum
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 16:45-18:05 JST

It goes without saying that 2020 has not gone as planned, and the world has been greatly impacted by COVID-19. Thus, the revised theme for this year’s 2020 Bilingual SIG forum will include stories from three bilingual/multilingual families living in Japan, in regards to how they’ve been supporting their languages and education throughout this turbulent time.

It goes without saying that 2020 has not gone as planned, and the world has been greatly impacted by COVID-19. Thus, the revised theme for this year’s 2020 Bilingual SIG forum will include stories from three bilingual/multilingual families living in Japan, in regards to how they’ve been supporting their languages and education throughout this turbulent time.

Speaker: Shaitan Alexandra

I have been involved in researching mixed-race identity in the context of Japan for the past couple of years. Whilst "race" itself is a controversial referent hotly debated in the ... more

Speaker: Christie Provenzano

I'm originally from Canada, and am an associate professor at Chikushi Jo Gakuen University, where I have a seminar class full of novice researchers in issues connected to bilingualism and ... more

Speaker: Diane Lamb-Obara

Currently an adjunct lecturer at Rikkyo University, with interests in teaching young learners, bilingual education, and intercultural project-based learning. I'm also the Program Chair for the Bilingual SIG and editor ... more

17:30 Sat

How regulatory fit can increase learner motivation #148

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 17:30-18:05 JST

From a psychological perspective, basic motivation to act is dependent upon how hard someone thinks a task is weighed against how much they value the outcome they expect. Importantly, it is the perception of this difficulty and outcome that matters most to motivation. Often, what we do is not as important as how we do it, and this colors these perceptions of ours. Regulatory focus theory comes from the field of psychology and is concerned with how we do something. It identifies two ways people can be motivated to work on a task: With a promotion focus, oriented toward growth and development of new ideas, and a prevention focus, which is more concerned with avoiding errors and measuring one’s performance against what is already known. Many task strategies favor promotion (finding new possible answers—creative tasks, brainstorming, discussing new topics) while others favor prevention (avoiding wrong answers—honing knowledge and skills that have already been learned, such as grammar and vocabulary). While learners may individually have a default preference, research also shows that they can be primed to thinking through either promotion or prevention lenses based on teacher language or a learner’s recall of a past successful experience when they used a promotion or prevention strategy respectively. This poster presentation will explain the basics of regulatory focus theory and illustrate how it can be applied to harmonize learners, common L2 learning tasks, and strategies in a synergistic manner—regulatory fit—for positive motivational results.

From a psychological perspective, basic motivation to act is dependent upon how hard someone thinks a task is weighed against how much they value the outcome they expect. Importantly, it is the perception of this difficulty and outcome that matters most to motivation. Often, what we do is not as important as how we do it, and this colors these perceptions of ours. Regulatory focus theory comes from the field of psychology and is concerned with how we do something. It identifies two ways people can be motivated to work on a task: With a promotion focus, oriented toward growth ... more

Speaker: Curtis Edlin

Curtis is a senior learning advisor in the Self Access Learning Center at Kanda University of International Studies in Chiba, Japan. He holds an MATESOL degree from SIT Graduate Institute. ... more

18:30 Sat

Technology: Bringing us together in a chaotic world #194

Keynote Presentation
Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 18:30-19:30 JST

The web was born just 30 years ago with its sharing technology promising a world of tolerance, goodwill, and understanding. Yet somewhere along this road, this dream has been shattered with our online world apparently to blame for the chaos we seem to find ourselves in.

This talk will be about why this has happened, what we can do about it, and how we need to redefine our relationship with this world both on a personal level and a societal one to better cope with this new reality.

The web was born just 30 years ago with its sharing technology promising a world of tolerance, goodwill, and understanding. Yet somewhere along this road, this dream has been shattered with our online world apparently to blame for the chaos we seem to find ourselves in.

This talk will be about why this has happened, what we can do about it, and how we need to redefine our relationship with this world both on a personal level and a societal one to better cope with this new reality.

Speaker: Gary Ross

Gary is a web developer, designer, and programmer, and the creator of Eventzil.la. He works as an Associate Professor at Kanazawa University where he develops the online learning program at ... more

19:30 Sat

The PanSIG Social #205

Finished
Sat, Jun 20, 19:30-21:30 JST

Join your host, Melodie Cook, for our online PanSIG social. Relax, chat, BYOF/B (food and booze)!

Join your host, Melodie Cook, for our online PanSIG social. Relax, chat, BYOF/B (food and booze)!

Host: Melodie Cook

I'm interested in teacher education, expatriate experiences with high-stakes testing, and teaching fostered and adopted children in Japan.

09:00 Sun

Better than Book Whispering - Young Learners & ER #124

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:00-09:35 JST

Book whispering is a method teachers employ to recommend books to students for the purpose of motivating them to engage in extensive reading (Miller, 2010). This method entails teachers recommending books to students based on questionnaire results about their preferences. Miller popularized this method in her best-selling book, the Book Whisperer, and claimed her sixth grade students in Texas read 40 novels a year because of it. While the idea of book whispering is popular in the ER community, there is no evidence of its effectiveness with EFL young learners. The presenter will show results of an action research project conducted in an eikaiwa school in Japan, which showed that autonomy in choosing books for ER was very important to them. Students overwhelmingly responded negatively to having the teacher directly recommend books, which lead the presenter to abandon the initial plan to implement book whispering in classes. It was found that an indirect recommendation method called Teacher Read Alouds, where the teacher read aloud the first book in a series or the first chapter of a novel in a series and then made the series available for students to borrow, was received very positively. Analysis of book borrowing data show that students often borrowed books in the series read aloud by the teacher.

Book whispering is a method teachers employ to recommend books to students for the purpose of motivating them to engage in extensive reading (Miller, 2010). This method entails teachers recommending books to students based on questionnaire results about their preferences. Miller popularized this method in her best-selling book, the Book Whisperer, and claimed her sixth grade students in Texas read 40 novels a year because of it. While the idea of book whispering is popular in the ER community, there is no evidence of its effectiveness with EFL young learners. The presenter will show results of an action research ... more

Speaker: Lesley Ito

Lesley Ito is a well-known teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, and award-winning materials writer based in Nagoya. She has taught in Japan for over twenty years, won “Best of JALT” ... more

09:00 Sun

Leading the L3-learners beyond the textbook #152

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:00-10:20 JST

Rudolf Reinelt, Ehime University Since 30+ years ago, Japanese university students have reported an increase in their English speaking abilities when taking the presenter’s German beginners’ courses. This “vitalizing” of previously learned foreign language parts was usually reported after several classes with the presenter’s approach based on learner activation with students speaking in class, practice with partners, class practice (not new!), practice fast in short time, and practice with different partners. Searching for research methods to prove the phenomenon and more reliable evidence than the spontaneous and hard to control narratives, the presenter administered a questionnaire at the end of the 2019 second term and asked the learners if and how learning a language other than English influenced or even led to improvement in their English abilities.

Bertlinde Voegel, Osaka University The presenter noticed that the students were willing to memorize phrases for dialogues, but they were rather hesitant to apply them in new contexts. In order to enable the students to gain confidence when forming sentences, the presenter asked the students to write texts, for instance about the field trip in High School. German textbooks for adults for the international market don´t cover the topic of trips to Asian destinations and the expressions for describing the fun and joy of being with friends away from home. What experiences are they actually making? An analysis of the texts and suggestions for useful phrases in German will be given.

Rudolf Reinelt, Ehime University Since 30+ years ago, Japanese university students have reported an increase in their English speaking abilities when taking the presenter’s German beginners’ courses. This “vitalizing” of previously learned foreign language parts was usually reported after several classes with the presenter’s approach based on learner activation with students speaking in class, practice with partners, class practice (not new!), practice fast in short time, and practice with different partners. Searching for research methods to prove the phenomenon and more reliable evidence than the spontaneous and hard to control narratives, the presenter administered a questionnaire at the end of the ... more

Speaker: Bertlinde Voegel

I am teaching conversation to beginner students of German at Osaka University. My research interest is fluency in speaking. I am focusing on the verb, the word order and the ... more

Speaker: Rudolf Reinelt

Teaching German on all levels and researching on how to do this better

09:00 Sun

ESP and CLIL: Directions and Reflections #184

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:00-10:20 JST

What’s new in ESP or CLIL in Japanese colleges and universities? With the emphasis on educating Japanese students for success on the world stage, more universities are implementing English education with specialized academic and professional content. Our panel of teacher-researchers will share their research and reflections on this expanding field.

Glen Hill

Many science majors do not seem motivated to study English despite it being the language of science. Many don't think it will be used in companies that will hire them. I showed my students three interviews from their science teachers; the focus was on their own English experiences, learning English, and advice to students. The purpose of the homework was to expose students to a peers' points of view and background in the language, because they don't normally get that directly from the science teachers. In my talk, I will describe the essays from students based on that homework, in which they gave their opinion of each teacher and on the one that was most interesting or surprising.

Alastair Graham-Marr

In recent years, across Asia, the number of English programs that teach English through content has been increasing, and many programs have adopted an EMI (English as Medium of Instruction) approach rather than CLIL or ESP/EAP. However, many Asian languages, such as Korean or Japanese, are syllable timed, or mora-timed, and consequently, such learners often lack a natural understanding of suprasegmental phonology.Learners therefore struggle to comprehend extended streams of connected speech that they would otherwise understand were it written down on paper. Given that many European languages are stress-timed and generally match the phonological rhythms of English, importing European styled EMI without any consideration to Asian phonological contexts is arguably negligent. This talk presents a study at a Japanese science university, where sheltered content was taught. The talk will outline the difficulties that students encountered.

Owen Kozlowski

In ideal situations instructors hope for ability-sorted learners, executive control of syllabi and curricula, and the ability to curate materials and resources. What are instructors to do when these hopes are unattainable to any degree and the typical structural, notional/functional, situational, skill-based, and TBLT classroom approaches appear unsuitable? This presentation will relate the presenter’s experience of adapting a CLIL/content-heavy approach to a challenging course and non-typical group of learners. Uses and applications of Google Classroom, YouTube, and other online resources will be discussed and explored.

What’s new in ESP or CLIL in Japanese colleges and universities? With the emphasis on educating Japanese students for success on the world stage, more universities are implementing English education with specialized academic and professional content. Our panel of teacher-researchers will share their research and reflections on this expanding field.

Glen Hill

Many science majors do not seem motivated to study English despite it being the language of science. Many don't think it will be used in companies that will hire them. I showed my students three interviews from their science teachers; the focus was on their own English experiences, learning English, ... more

Speaker: Alastair Graham-Marr

Alastair Graham-Marr is a professor at the Tokyo University of Science and an editor at Abax Ltd.

Speaker: Owen Kozlowski

From kindergarten floor, to corporate boardroom, to university lecture hall, Owen Kozlowski’s 15+ years of teaching in Japan have been in nearly every context imaginable. Currently a full-time shokutaku lecturer ... more

Speaker: Glen Hill

I have a master's degree in science, but I've been teaching English in Japan since 1998. For the past 15+ years, I've been a tenured professor at a science university, ... more

09:00 Sun

The Conference Lobby Day 2 #210

Open Space
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:00-17:00 JST

Where to hang out

Where to hang out

Host: Dawn Lucovich

PanSIG Virtual Conference Committee Chair / The University of Nagano, Assistant Professor / Nagano JALT, President

09:45 Sun

Improving Presentation Protocols #120

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:45-10:20 JST

This presentation will discuss how to (a) assign presentations, (b) collect them, (c) grade them with a viable peer evaluation rubric, (d) compile and transmit feedback to students, and (e) implement feedback and reflection protocols that ensure students are gaining the most from any presentation syllabus component. Results are based on a decade's worth of research and will be presented such that even novice ICT users should be able to replicate the procedure.

This presentation will discuss how to (a) assign presentations, (b) collect them, (c) grade them with a viable peer evaluation rubric, (d) compile and transmit feedback to students, and (e) implement feedback and reflection protocols that ensure students are gaining the most from any presentation syllabus component. Results are based on a decade's worth of research and will be presented such that even novice ICT users should be able to replicate the procedure.

Speaker: George MacLean

George MacLean is a professor at the University of the Ryukyus. He has taught at primary-junior high and university levels in Japan and in the International School system. His research ... more

09:45 Sun

Snakes and Ladders: Drivers of Student Differences in Reading Amounts #123

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:45-10:20 JST

The benefits of extensive reading are widely recognized in research (Day, 2010), but it can be challenging to get students to read enough to reap such benefits. While some students read much more than required by their assignments, others read the minimum amount or less. Student motivation to read has been investigated quantitatively using questionnaires (Mori, 2002; Takase, 2007), but less research has taken a quantitative approach. Milliner and Cote (2015) used focus group discussions to explore disengaged students’ perceptions of reading done on digital platforms.

This study explored factors that influence the amount of reading done as homework by students at a Japanese university using an English virtual library of graded readers. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 14 prolific readers and 16 reluctant readers in Japanese to identify factors that influenced the amounts they read. Students were selected from 352 freshman students across 10 classes varying in faculty and proficiency levels. Students whose reading word counts were within the top or bottom 5% of their respective classes were approached to participate in interviews conducted outside of regular class time. Audio recordings of the interviews were analyzed to identify common themes.

Based upon these themes, several recommendations are made to help reduce obstacles for reluctant readers as well as take advantage of the mindsets and strategies of prolific readers.

The benefits of extensive reading are widely recognized in research (Day, 2010), but it can be challenging to get students to read enough to reap such benefits. While some students read much more than required by their assignments, others read the minimum amount or less. Student motivation to read has been investigated quantitatively using questionnaires (Mori, 2002; Takase, 2007), but less research has taken a quantitative approach. Milliner and Cote (2015) used focus group discussions to explore disengaged students’ perceptions of reading done on digital platforms.

This study explored factors that influence the amount of reading done as homework by ... more

Speaker: Pat Conaway

I teach EFL classes to freshman students in the medical, agriculture, engineering, humanities, and education departments. It’s a lot of fun seeing the different personalities of the students with such ... more

09:45 Sun

Intercultural competence in domestic students #129

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:45-10:20 JST

The rapid development of international education has occurred alongside a growing need for higher education institutions to educate global citizens. Yet, traditional approaches to internationalisation, such as a mobility, have proven to be restricted to a small percentage of students, and Japanese undergraduates often cite financial, safety, and job-hunting concerns as obstacles to studying abroad. Internationalisation-at-home has emerged as a viable alternative to experiences abroad in the quest for global human resources. This session is aimed at presenting cases of two Top Global universities leading internationalisation in Japan and their institutional efforts to foster interculturally competent domestic students through contact with international students on campus. I will discuss results from a longitudinal survey, carried out over one-year, of 164 Japanese students engaged in a range of curricular and extracurricular programmes with both international and domestic students and an intercultural focus, including teacher-led lectures and programmes, a residential programme aimed at first-year students, and regular university circles. Results from 10 follow-up student interviews shed further light on the factors promoting and hindering the development of globally competent graduates on domestic campuses, thus generating a discussion platform from which internationalisation-at-home strategies can be implemented more effectively.

The rapid development of international education has occurred alongside a growing need for higher education institutions to educate global citizens. Yet, traditional approaches to internationalisation, such as a mobility, have proven to be restricted to a small percentage of students, and Japanese undergraduates often cite financial, safety, and job-hunting concerns as obstacles to studying abroad. Internationalisation-at-home has emerged as a viable alternative to experiences abroad in the quest for global human resources. This session is aimed at presenting cases of two Top Global universities leading internationalisation in Japan and their institutional efforts to foster interculturally competent domestic students through contact ... more

Speaker: Ana Sofia Hofmeyr

I am an English Lecturer at Kansai University, and completing my PhD at Osaka University on the relationship between internationalisation-at-home strategies and the development of intercultural competence in domestic students.

09:45 Sun

An ALT’s case study: music for young ESL learners #171

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:45-10:20 JST

Music in English lessons is important to introduce new grammar and vocabulary to young learners. Niigata City Japanese English Teachers (JTE) and Assistant Language Teachers (ALT) in public schools use original songs in textbooks provided by the Board of Education. Given that students and new teachers take time to remember new tunes, this study suggests utilizing nursery rhyme tunes that students already know to teach pronunciation and syllables. This paper employs a quantitative method to data collection and analysis. It analyzes 38 Grade 4 students’ responses to nursery rhyme tunes when acquiring new English words. Furthermore, students’ response to composing their own lyrics is observed. Students’ evaluation responses find that 79% of participants recalled new English words learned, and 63% found music useful when learning English. 11 participants recalled the lyrics from the previous unit, of which 8 participants managed to write the lyrics in Japanese (katakana). The results suggest activating schemata eases the recollection of words learned previously. Teachers can use this method for any topic in elementary Grade 4 to teach new words by adding familiar musical element. This method will be continuously developed to assist other JTEs and ALTs in various topics as an essential classroom material.

Music in English lessons is important to introduce new grammar and vocabulary to young learners. Niigata City Japanese English Teachers (JTE) and Assistant Language Teachers (ALT) in public schools use original songs in textbooks provided by the Board of Education. Given that students and new teachers take time to remember new tunes, this study suggests utilizing nursery rhyme tunes that students already know to teach pronunciation and syllables. This paper employs a quantitative method to data collection and analysis. It analyzes 38 Grade 4 students’ responses to nursery rhyme tunes when acquiring new English words. Furthermore, students’ response to composing ... more

Speaker: Emily Choong

Emily is an ALT from Malaysia. She teaches elementary and junior high English in Niigata City. She enjoys adding musical elements to her lessons by playing a musical instrument and/or ... more

09:45 Sun

Survey validation through vocabulary analysis #177

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 09:45-10:20 JST

The researcher explored how vocabulary knowledge may affect responses from L2 English users who were requested to complete Vandergrift’s (2005) Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ). Six participants (low-intermediate to advanced L2 English learners) from varied educational and professional backgrounds were recruited for this study. Participants were instructed to complete the MALQ and use textual enhancements (e.g., highlighting, underlining) to indicate the degree of familiarity with new or infrequently viewed words and phrases. Participants were also instructed to write notes regarding any unknown vocabulary expressions. After collecting the participants’ data, the researcher engaged in confirmation checks with each individual. The researcher entered the statements presented on the MALQ into the Compleat Lexical Tutor to determine the word families of the vocabulary used. The participants indicated that vocabulary items greater than the 3000-word family range and multiword expressions influenced responses, regardless of their language levels. Advanced L2 English users noted that a few construct items could be misinterpreted and become unintended distractors for lower level L2 users, while low-intermediate L2 English speakers emphasized the necessity of learning secondary and tertiary word meanings. All participants stated the need to learn multi-word units rather than vocabulary in isolation. During this presentation, I will discuss how participants were recruited and describe their backgrounds; how confirmation checks were conducted and analyzed; the limitations of this study; and how the methodology could be applied and modified for different contexts. Suggestions and comments from the attending audience will be warmly welcomed.

The researcher explored how vocabulary knowledge may affect responses from L2 English users who were requested to complete Vandergrift’s (2005) Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ). Six participants (low-intermediate to advanced L2 English learners) from varied educational and professional backgrounds were recruited for this study. Participants were instructed to complete the MALQ and use textual enhancements (e.g., highlighting, underlining) to indicate the degree of familiarity with new or infrequently viewed words and phrases. Participants were also instructed to write notes regarding any unknown vocabulary expressions. After collecting the participants’ data, the researcher engaged in confirmation checks with each individual. The researcher ... more

Speaker: Reginald Gentry

I am a researcher and educator based at the University Fukui. My research interests are speaking assessment and evaluation, and curriculum design.

10:30 Sun

University teacher and student views of humor #104

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:05 JST

This presentation will report on the results of a survey designed to elicit learners’ and educators’ perceptions of the role of humor in university English language courses. The participants included students taking required language courses at ten universities across Japan (n = 956) as well as a selection of both Japanese and non-Japanese university-level educators (n = 50). Quantitative results of the study covered such variables as the role of humor in the classroom and how humor can both decrease L2 anxiety and deepen understanding of the target culture. Additionally, qualitative, open-ended survey items queried learners and instructors about the interrelation between humor, language proficiency, and cultural understanding and the potential negative effects of humor use in the language classroom.

Many of the respondents highlighted humor’s value for improving classroom atmosphere while others focused on how they had benefited personally, such as through increased language-learning motivation or a greater degree of teaching satisfaction. Additionally, many cited concerns about how cultural dissimilarities in values and humor focus can lead to misunderstandings.

After reviewing the results, the presenter will share expanded insights from follow-up oral interviews with select participants. Finally, implications for language pedagogy and intercultural communicative competence will be considered.

This presentation will report on the results of a survey designed to elicit learners’ and educators’ perceptions of the role of humor in university English language courses. The participants included students taking required language courses at ten universities across Japan (n = 956) as well as a selection of both Japanese and non-Japanese university-level educators (n = 50). Quantitative results of the study covered such variables as the role of humor in the classroom and how humor can both decrease L2 anxiety and deepen understanding of the target culture. Additionally, qualitative, open-ended survey items queried learners and instructors about the ... more

Speaker: John Rucynski

I am currently associate professor in the Center for Liberal Arts & Language Education at Okayama University. My research interests include language and culture integrated learning, CBI/CLIL, and the role ... more

10:30 Sun

The why and how of teacher created podcasts #116

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:05 JST

Podcasts have become ubiquitous in all aspects of modern life, including the English language classroom. It seems as though there is a podcast for just about every person’s areas of interest. There are, of course, a plethora of podcasts made specifically for English learners. But what if there are no podcasts that serve the needs of your students? Maybe their interests and abilities do not align with anything available to them. In this presentation, I will discuss the reasons for making a podcast specifically tailored to your students' needs and interests. I will also discuss some of the practical aspects that go into making a podcast, including basic equipment needed and internet resources needed. I will also share how I have used the podcasts I have recorded with my students for extensive listening practice. As many Japanese students may be unfamiliar with podcasts in general, I plan to share ways I have helped my students learn how to access and best utilize the podcast format on both their phones and computers. Podcasts need not be limited to students at an intermediate level and above. I will show you how to get past the initial hurdles of getting started. Getting started might seem like a daunting task, but with just a little help, anyone can be a podcaster.

Podcasts have become ubiquitous in all aspects of modern life, including the English language classroom. It seems as though there is a podcast for just about every person’s areas of interest. There are, of course, a plethora of podcasts made specifically for English learners. But what if there are no podcasts that serve the needs of your students? Maybe their interests and abilities do not align with anything available to them. In this presentation, I will discuss the reasons for making a podcast specifically tailored to your students' needs and interests. I will also discuss some of the practical aspects ... more

Speaker: Jonathan Isaacson

I'm Jonathan and I've been teaching in Japan at various levels for 16 years. I am interested in both podcasting for English learning and promoting paperless classrooms.

10:30 Sun

A global approach to discussion class materials #130

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:05 JST

While there have been attempts from Japanese universities to be more international and produce global jinzai (global human resources), guidelines for implementation have remained ambiguous. Therefore, this presentation explains how a global approach was used to design materials for an English discussion class. The approach combines elements from global Englishes, based on suggestions by Galloway (2017) that learners should be aware of world Englishes and English as a lingua franca, as well as elements from intercultural communication, based on suggestions by Yoshida, Yashiro and Suzuki (2013) that learners should develop an understanding of themselves, their own culture and cultural differences. Materials for two lessons are shown. One of them is about English in Singapore, as understanding the role of Singlish is beneficial to understand the connection between varieties of English and cultural identity (Jenkins, 2015). The other is about individualism versus collectivism, which is seen as essential in understanding the difference between western and Asian cultures (Servaes, 2016). The effectiveness of these lessons is discussed, and suggestions are made about how this approach could be used to generate more lessons which will help university students to be ready to successfully communicate with people from all over the world.

While there have been attempts from Japanese universities to be more international and produce global jinzai (global human resources), guidelines for implementation have remained ambiguous. Therefore, this presentation explains how a global approach was used to design materials for an English discussion class. The approach combines elements from global Englishes, based on suggestions by Galloway (2017) that learners should be aware of world Englishes and English as a lingua franca, as well as elements from intercultural communication, based on suggestions by Yoshida, Yashiro and Suzuki (2013) that learners should develop an understanding of themselves, their own culture and cultural differences. ... more

Speaker: Tim Andrewartha

Since joining the British Council, I have taught at two universities in Japan. Last year I taught a discussion class at Chiba University. Currently, I am teaching an EAP course ... more

10:30 Sun

Virtual Presentations at ELT Conferences #164

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:05 JST

There are many reasons that travel to conferences by presenters may be unwanted or impossible. Such reasons include, but are not limited to, physical disability, lack of financing, political restrictions, and eco-sustainability concerns. Nonetheless, presenting at conferences is often key to academic and professional networking, disseminating one's research and ideas, and career progression. Thus, there arises for some a tension between the inability or lack of desire to travel to present and the perception of the need to present at conferences. Virtual presentations, in which the presenting party is physically remote from the audience, could dissolve, or at least ameliorate, this tension. The study presented here investigates the presentation format policies of more than 200 conferences in the field of English Language Teaching and adjacent fields. The percentage of conferences that permit virtual conferences is reported, and for those conferences that do permit virtual presentations, it is reported whether the format is synchronous, asynchronous, or mixed. This data then informs a discussion about the ethics of travel for conferences in terms of inclusivity/accessibility and sustainability. Some potential benefits of virtual presentations for conferences that do not currently permit them are also discussed.

There are many reasons that travel to conferences by presenters may be unwanted or impossible. Such reasons include, but are not limited to, physical disability, lack of financing, political restrictions, and eco-sustainability concerns. Nonetheless, presenting at conferences is often key to academic and professional networking, disseminating one's research and ideas, and career progression. Thus, there arises for some a tension between the inability or lack of desire to travel to present and the perception of the need to present at conferences. Virtual presentations, in which the presenting party is physically remote from the audience, could dissolve, or at least ameliorate, this ... more

Speaker: Michael Brown

Michael is a lecturer in the English Language Institute at Kanda University of International Studies. His research interests include corpus-assisted discourse analysis, ecolinguistics, and ‘global issues’ in education. He currently ... more

10:30 Sun

Etymology and vocabulary in the classroom #178

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:05 JST

When a student finds a group of synonyms in their Japanese-English dictionary they may struggle to decide which is most appropriate to use. A common reason for this is how synonyms often have different root languages in English. With a little awareness of etymology in English we can help our students overcome this barrier to learning and make their vocabulary-building more efficient. This presentation is based on the presenter's background in teaching and classical languages and will highlight the role of etymology in our understanding of word use and provide teachers with advice on how to make our students more etymologically aware. The presenter will give some common examples of synonyms and how their word origin affects their usage and how this can be applied across much of the vocabulary a student will come across. Attendees will not only be able to guide their students to learning vocabulary better but may also develop an awareness of their own classroom English.

When a student finds a group of synonyms in their Japanese-English dictionary they may struggle to decide which is most appropriate to use. A common reason for this is how synonyms often have different root languages in English. With a little awareness of etymology in English we can help our students overcome this barrier to learning and make their vocabulary-building more efficient. This presentation is based on the presenter's background in teaching and classical languages and will highlight the role of etymology in our understanding of word use and provide teachers with advice on how to make our students more ... more

10:30 Sun

Students’ perspectives of peer support in reading classes #191

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:05 JST

Do all students like reading classes? If not, what reading activities can teachers do to guide them in reading? It is natural for students who have a certain English competence to read through textbooks or extensive reading books actively, but is not easy for other students who have negative feelings toward reading. To solve this gap, group textbook reading activities are effective to use the power of peer support in classrooms. Especially, some students who are positive, can play significant roles to support other students who lack energy in group activities. In addition, students did extensive reading activities at their home and book-talk in classes regularly, so they gradually got used to read stories by themselves to describe the book contents and characters. Overwhelmingly negative attitudes which some students showed at the beginning disappeared in the classrooms. At the end of the semester, the students stated that they held self-esteem while participating in the reading classes on their self-evaluation sheets as formative assessment. This presentation is practice-oriented and explains the correlation between effective reading activities with peer support and students’ perspectives are taken from questionnaire and interviews.

Do all students like reading classes? If not, what reading activities can teachers do to guide them in reading? It is natural for students who have a certain English competence to read through textbooks or extensive reading books actively, but is not easy for other students who have negative feelings toward reading. To solve this gap, group textbook reading activities are effective to use the power of peer support in classrooms. Especially, some students who are positive, can play significant roles to support other students who lack energy in group activities. In addition, students did extensive reading activities at their ... more

Speaker: Yoko Takano

Yoko Takano has been teaching English in her small school :OKIDOKI Eigo School for 24 years in Nagoya. After obtaining MA TESOL from NUFS, she started providing communicative language teaching ... more

10:30 Sun

Teaching Younger Learners Forum #172

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 10:30-11:50 JST

In the wake of COVID-19, we are going to have a forum that is open to the public using on-line technology. Here we will discuss the progress of the SIG, what is going on, and the plans for the future. We should also have time to address any teaching ideas you have for others and work to better our teaching with suggestions from a panel of experienced teachers. Please join us in sharing your ideas and thoughts!

In the wake of COVID-19, we are going to have a forum that is open to the public using on-line technology. Here we will discuss the progress of the SIG, what is going on, and the plans for the future. We should also have time to address any teaching ideas you have for others and work to better our teaching with suggestions from a panel of experienced teachers. Please join us in sharing your ideas and thoughts!

Speaker: Gaby Benthien

I am currently teaching at Shumei University and Chuo University in Japan. I have taught Japanese and EFL at primary and secondary schools in Australia and Japan, and have also ... more

Speaker: Kate Sato

In 1988 started teaching EFL in France. In 2002 I started my own English language school for children from ages 0-12 in Sapporo, Hokkaido. I moved into researching teaching phonics ... more

Speaker: Grant Osterman

Dr. Osterman has been teaching in Japan since 1993. Originally from a small Midwestern town in the United States, he earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s ... more

11:15 Sun

Sponsored: Lexxica R&D WordEngine Forum #203

Sun, Jun 21, 11:15-10:50 JST

For new and experienced WordEngine users. All questions answered, all suggestions welcome.

For new and experienced WordEngine users. All questions answered, all suggestions welcome.

Speaker: Guy Cihi

EdTech Entrepreneur - Producer of WordEngine. Attention ER advocates: Use the free VCheck lexical test to ensure that your students are reading at the optimal level based on their ... more

11:15 Sun

Engaging learners with team-based learning (TBL) #118

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 11:15-11:50 JST

This presentation introduces an action research project conducted at a university in western Japan during the 2019 Fall semester. The project involved a group of twenty-eight non-English majors enrolled in an elective business-focused project taught by the presenter and aimed at investigating the effectiveness of augmenting a project-based learning (PBL) curriculum with team-based learning (the other TBL) elements. This interactive talk starts with some contextual background, goes on to offer brief outlines of PBL and TBL, and then gives a week-by-week overview of how each class meeting unfolded as well as how technology was used to manage the course and assess performance. Some of the more salient findings include increased learner engagement and achievement as measured by readiness assurance tests, both individual and team. After covering the findings of the intervention, its successes and shortcomings will be evaluated. It is hoped that this research might inspire others to experiment with PBL, TBL and other active learning approaches in their second language classrooms.

This presentation introduces an action research project conducted at a university in western Japan during the 2019 Fall semester. The project involved a group of twenty-eight non-English majors enrolled in an elective business-focused project taught by the presenter and aimed at investigating the effectiveness of augmenting a project-based learning (PBL) curriculum with team-based learning (the other TBL) elements. This interactive talk starts with some contextual background, goes on to offer brief outlines of PBL and TBL, and then gives a week-by-week overview of how each class meeting unfolded as well as how technology was used to manage the course and ... more

Speaker: Brent A. Jones

Brent A. Jones has taught English for Specific Purposes in Hawaii, Japan and other parts of Asia since 1987. He was the coordinator of the Business English program in the ... more

11:15 Sun

L2 readers’ attitude & its effect on word count #125

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 11:15-11:50 JST

Even though it is logical that students who have a good reading attitude should read more books, that truism still needs to be investigated in detail. The presenter verified whether Nuttall(2005)’s virtuous circle is true by asking two research questions : (1) Does a student's reading attitude influence the amount of reading they can accomplish? (2) How does the amount of reading affect their reading attitude? Questionnaires based on Lee and Schallert (2014) were given to fifty-five university freshmen before and after a fifteen-week extensive reading program. One of the constituents of reading attitude, i.e. conative (behavioral intentions) factor, was analyzed by investigating the correlation between the subjects’ answers and their total reading word count. Statistically significant relationships between the variables were found. The English proficiency level of the subjects was ranging from false beginner to lower intermediate. The number of words they read during the semester was recorded by MReader. The average word count was 105,147. The scores of TOEIC Bridge test was also scrutinized. The findings indicated that the subjects’ word count steadily increased even when they did not start with a positive reading attitude. On the other hand, it was determined that increasing the amount of reading promoted a more positive reading attitude. The findings imply that the total amount of reading increases even if readers do not have a positive reading attitude at the outset, but the increased amount of reading will then have a marked influence on the subjects’ reading attitude.

Even though it is logical that students who have a good reading attitude should read more books, that truism still needs to be investigated in detail. The presenter verified whether Nuttall(2005)’s virtuous circle is true by asking two research questions : (1) Does a student's reading attitude influence the amount of reading they can accomplish? (2) How does the amount of reading affect their reading attitude? Questionnaires based on Lee and Schallert (2014) were given to fifty-five university freshmen before and after a fifteen-week extensive reading program. One of the constituents of reading attitude, i.e. conative (behavioral intentions) factor, ... more

11:15 Sun

Global education through online international collaboration #132

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 11:15-11:50 JST

Students today are facing an increasingly interconnected global society that demands cross-cultural understanding and communication skills. Thus, fostering global education through online international collaboration and exchange in language classrooms has proven to be beneficial to students (El-Hindi, 1998; Schreiber and Jansz, 2020).

This study examines a school exchange program conducted through live video conferencing between two schools in Japan and Nepal. Through the exchange program, students learned about school life, culture, and society in each other's countries. The impacts of the program on broadening student's understanding of culture and society in each other's countries and their English language ability and motivation were evaluated through the questionnaire survey and observations. Participating students took the pre- and post- session-questionnaires.

Quantitative results show that students' interest and knowledge about the culture and society of each others' countries and motivation to learn English increased significantly after the exchange program. This technique was found to be effective not only to learn the language but also to enhance cross-cultural awareness that fosters global education. References: El-Hindi, Amelia E. (1998). Beyond Classroom Boundaries: Constructivist Teaching with the Internet (Exploring Literacy on the Internet), Reading Teacher, 51(8), pp. 694-700. Schreiber, Brooke R; Jansz, Mihiri (2020). Reducing distance through online international collaboration, ELT Journal, 74(1), pp. 63–72, https://doi.org/10.1093/elt/ccz045

Students today are facing an increasingly interconnected global society that demands cross-cultural understanding and communication skills. Thus, fostering global education through online international collaboration and exchange in language classrooms has proven to be beneficial to students (El-Hindi, 1998; Schreiber and Jansz, 2020).

This study examines a school exchange program conducted through live video conferencing between two schools in Japan and Nepal. Through the exchange program, students learned about school life, culture, and society in each other's countries. The impacts of the program on broadening student's understanding of culture and society in each other's countries and their English language ability and ... more

11:15 Sun

Creating vocabulary lists based on corpus linguistics #179

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 11:15-11:50 JST

Teaching vocabulary is integral to teaching language. However, selecting which words should be taught can be extremely challenging. In order to enhance students’ fluency and vocabulary, 110 Freshman students at a private university in Chiba were given Web, Sasao and Ballance’s Vocabulary Levels Test Version B (2017) at the beginning of the 2019 academic year to determine their vocabulary level. Based on the results of the test, the corresponding BNC/COCA headwords lists were then used to select the vocabulary words to be used in this study. As those lists include only headwords listed in alphabetical order, it was necessary to alter the lists in order to make them more useful for classroom purposes. First, the BNC/ COCA lists were reorganized based on frequency. The lists were then lemmatized to avoid confusion (i.e., direct, directed). Polysemy was taken into consideration when choosing the most core meaning of the word . A sentence in which that word sense was used was provided for context. Finally, the most common kanji used for the head word was added and a translated version of the sentence was provided. The lists were created to provide a stronger base for students to remember the word lists and to connect those words back to their L1. This presentation will discuss how the lists were created, the rationale behind it, and how they can be used.

Teaching vocabulary is integral to teaching language. However, selecting which words should be taught can be extremely challenging. In order to enhance students’ fluency and vocabulary, 110 Freshman students at a private university in Chiba were given Web, Sasao and Ballance’s Vocabulary Levels Test Version B (2017) at the beginning of the 2019 academic year to determine their vocabulary level. Based on the results of the test, the corresponding BNC/COCA headwords lists were then used to select the vocabulary words to be used in this study. As those lists include only headwords listed in alphabetical order, it was necessary to ... more

Speaker: Sarah Miyoshi Deutchman

I started teaching at the university level two years ago. I am interested in finding ways to integrate corpora into teaching English. Recently, I have started a project ... more

11:15 Sun

Less is more - Academic poster design that works #195

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 11:15-11:50 JST

A major part of brain activity is given over to visual processing (Fiser et al., 2004) yet many "academic posters" fail to make much visual impact. This presentation takes a hard look at academic poster design to identify what works and what doesn’t. Using tips from the fields of graphic poster design and infographics, the presenter will offer some key rules and ideas to help make your academic posters more successful. Topics covered include use of text and language, colour and shape, as well as high-impact graphs and charts. With suggestions on software and online tools for poster design, and resources for artwork and creating new data visualisations, this session will help you to think afresh about poster design, both for your own academic posters and when working with students on poster projects. Most of the principles presented will be equally applicable to creating effective presentation slides.

A major part of brain activity is given over to visual processing (Fiser et al., 2004) yet many "academic posters" fail to make much visual impact. This presentation takes a hard look at academic poster design to identify what works and what doesn’t. Using tips from the fields of graphic poster design and infographics, the presenter will offer some key rules and ideas to help make your academic posters more successful. Topics covered include use of text and language, colour and shape, as well as high-impact graphs and charts. With suggestions on software and online tools for poster design, and ... more

Speaker: Samuel Bruce

Samuel Bruce has been teaching EFL and ESL for the past 22 years. He has taught in Hong Kong, China, New Zealand, the UK, and Japan. He began teaching at ... more

12:00 Sun

Creating a language table at a university in Japan #106

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:00-12:35 JST

Self-access language learning centers are a rapidly emerging phenomenon in Asia (Ryan, et al., 2019). However, there are few self-access language tables documented in the English-language literature in Japan, such as those at International Christian University (Ueno, 2017, 2019) and Osaka University. This presentation will introduce a foreign language table (FLT) initiative for undergraduate EFL learners at a new public university in Japan.

In the university curriculum, students take 400 minutes of English-language classes for 14 weeks in a mandatory 2-year program that culminates in a short-term study abroad program in an English-using country. In preparation for this program, many students have expressed the desire to interact with foreigners, and to use English and other foreign languages. However, students often do not know of or take advantage of language opportunities when they are offered on the university campus or at the university dormitory. Thus, issues about student outreach, participation, and engagement will be presented, in addition to how these issues were addressed throughout the academic year. Future directions include the development of the lunchtime language table into a student-led extracurricular club, and the subsequent proposal to develop the FLT into a standalone space.

Self-access language learning centers are a rapidly emerging phenomenon in Asia (Ryan, et al., 2019). However, there are few self-access language tables documented in the English-language literature in Japan, such as those at International Christian University (Ueno, 2017, 2019) and Osaka University. This presentation will introduce a foreign language table (FLT) initiative for undergraduate EFL learners at a new public university in Japan.

In the university curriculum, students take 400 minutes of English-language classes for 14 weeks in a mandatory 2-year program that culminates in a short-term study abroad program in an English-using country. In preparation for this program, many ... more

Speaker: Dawn Lucovich

PanSIG Virtual Conference Committee Chair / The University of Nagano, Assistant Professor / Nagano JALT, President

12:00 Sun

Intercultural competence: An overview #133

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:00-12:35 JST

In an increasingly interconnected world, our students now need intercultural communication skills for their personal and professional relationships more than ever. What the term intercultural communication comprises, how it can be learned, and how that can be applied to the classroom, however, is not always clear.

This video poster session will begin with some background from a few theorists who have described the nature and relevance of intercultural communication. They include Edward T. Hall, who suggested the pervasive influence of an unconscious aspect of culture, and Michael Byram, who laid out the attributes of an effective intercultural communicator.

Moving onto how these communication skills are acquired, the second part of the session will consider culture through the lens of social psychology. Specifically, there will be a description of implicit knowledge, its role in how we interpret and intuitively respond to ambiguous cues in interpersonal interaction, as well as empirical research on how these implicit interpersonal perceptive skills develop.

Because of this unconscious component of culture, the challenge for us as educators is to bring experiential approaches into our teaching practices. In a foreign language learning environment detached from any large community of speakers, though, this is especially challenging. As a potential solution, an approach to intercultural learning through film and television will be briefly described. Through these visual storytelling media, now accessible internationally via streaming services, learners may be able to develop the beginnings of deep and implicit understandings of cultural practices and perspectives.

In an increasingly interconnected world, our students now need intercultural communication skills for their personal and professional relationships more than ever. What the term intercultural communication comprises, how it can be learned, and how that can be applied to the classroom, however, is not always clear.

This video poster session will begin with some background from a few theorists who have described the nature and relevance of intercultural communication. They include Edward T. Hall, who suggested the pervasive influence of an unconscious aspect of culture, and Michael Byram, who laid out the attributes of an effective intercultural communicator.

Moving onto how these ... more

Speaker: Neil Talbert

Membership Chair of Intercultural Communication in Language Education (ICLE) SIG

12:00 Sun

Curriculum integration through interdisciplinary collaboration #166

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:00-12:35 JST

Interdisciplinary collaboration combines approaches and methods from different disciplines with the intention of improving students’ learning experiences and outcomes (DelliCarpini, 2009). It has been described as having the potential to be a valuable and effective method of professional development (Dove & Honigsfeld, 2010). In this presentation, we describe an ongoing action research project following the cyclical process outlined by Altrichter, Posch and Somekh (1993). We used interdisciplinary collaboration in the form of joint writing and presentation tasks in World History and English Expression (writing) classes in an attempt to increase integration between English and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses at a technical college in Japan. We explain the rationale behind this action research project, its initial implementation and expansion to include other tasks and STEM subjects, and our impressions of the successes, failures, and limitations of the project over the 2 years. We conclude with our plans for future iterations of the project and suggestions for fellow teachers to incorporate interdisciplinary collaboration into their courses.

Interdisciplinary collaboration combines approaches and methods from different disciplines with the intention of improving students’ learning experiences and outcomes (DelliCarpini, 2009). It has been described as having the potential to be a valuable and effective method of professional development (Dove & Honigsfeld, 2010). In this presentation, we describe an ongoing action research project following the cyclical process outlined by Altrichter, Posch and Somekh (1993). We used interdisciplinary collaboration in the form of joint writing and presentation tasks in World History and English Expression (writing) classes in an attempt to increase integration between English and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) ... more

Speaker: James Taylor

James Taylor grew up in the Medway Delta in the United Kingdom and holds a BA French and Italian and MA TESOL, both from the University of Leeds. He taught ... more

12:00 Sun

An overview of a school's curriculum for the student-centered classroom #173

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:00-12:35 JST

In this show and tell presentation, the speaker will talk about a school's four skills curriculum for a student-centered classroom. Although not a research-based presentation, much of what will be discussed will focused on research in 2018 from the United States and will follow the seven principles of student-centered learning. Those principles are learning that has positive relationships, whole child needs, positive identity, student ownership and agency, real-world relevant, competency progression, and anytime/anywhere features. The target audience will be teachers of kindergarten through 12th grade students. As many educators know, a school’s curriculum can set it apart from other competitors in the same geographical region. In other words, a school that focuses on its learners, and not just a one size fits all ideology, has a greater chance at reaching all learners in its institution. Specifically, the presenter will talk about a schools’ method used to instruct students, a differentiated curriculum, an effect assessment and evaluation process, educational results, and finally whether or not this matches the location the teacher works in. This will be an interactive presentation with questions being raised during discussion. There will be personal stories and lessons learned from over two decades of running a conversation school. Participant takeaways will be helping them assess their current curriculum needs and showing them how to develop a solid student-centered curriculum that benefits both their students and the school where they work. With a student-centered ideology in place, the pedagogy shifts from being standardized to individualized.

In this show and tell presentation, the speaker will talk about a school's four skills curriculum for a student-centered classroom. Although not a research-based presentation, much of what will be discussed will focused on research in 2018 from the United States and will follow the seven principles of student-centered learning. Those principles are learning that has positive relationships, whole child needs, positive identity, student ownership and agency, real-world relevant, competency progression, and anytime/anywhere features. The target audience will be teachers of kindergarten through 12th grade students. As many educators know, a school’s curriculum can set it apart from other competitors ... more

Speaker: Grant Osterman

Dr. Osterman has been teaching in Japan since 1993. Originally from a small Midwestern town in the United States, he earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s ... more

12:00 Sun

ER SIG forum #126

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:00-13:20 JST

Conducting classroom-based research on extensive reading allows language teachers to contribute to knowledge about a valuable approach to language learning; however, a strong understanding of research methodology is essential to execute meaningful studies. Greg Sholdt reports on a unique professional development project that helps language teachers gain skills and knowledge related to conducting quantitative research. He provides an overview of the project and explains benefits of this approach to professional development. Following the presentation, Pat Conaway will lead a discussion on how the ER SIG can replicate the project framework to increase the opportunities to conduct research and raise its quality.

While results from research can support using ER in the classroom, It is also important for teachers to get their students interested in extensive reading with engaging classroom activities. The final part of the seminar will be a slam session in which teachers will have a maximum of five minutes to explain a successful ER activity they have used: Making picture dictionaries, Reader's theater, Pattern seekers - teaching and testing scanning, the Extensive Reading Foundation placement test, and using the V-Check level test.

Conducting classroom-based research on extensive reading allows language teachers to contribute to knowledge about a valuable approach to language learning; however, a strong understanding of research methodology is essential to execute meaningful studies. Greg Sholdt reports on a unique professional development project that helps language teachers gain skills and knowledge related to conducting quantitative research. He provides an overview of the project and explains benefits of this approach to professional development. Following the presentation, Pat Conaway will lead a discussion on how the ER SIG can replicate the project framework to increase the opportunities to conduct research and raise its ... more

Speaker: Greg Rouault

I have been teaching English as a foreign language in Japan since 1999. In higher education, I have taught 4 skills, study abroad test prep, EAP, and content-based courses with ... more

Speaker: Guy Cihi

EdTech Entrepreneur - Producer of WordEngine. Attention ER advocates: Use the free VCheck lexical test to ensure that your students are reading at the optimal level based on their ... more

Speaker: Mark Brierley

Seminar co-chair. Editor of Extensive Reading in Japan.

Speaker: Glen Hill

I have a master's degree in science, but I've been teaching English in Japan since 1998. For the past 15+ years, I've been a tenured professor at a science university, ... more

Speaker: Parisa Fardad

I majored in Linguistics and have more that 15 years of English teaching experience at universities and language schools and currently teach at MY English school and Miyagi Gakuin University. ... more

Speaker: Greg Sholdt

I am currently based at at Konan University and have over 20 years of language teaching experience. My interests include classroom-based research methods, extensive reading, and English for academic purposes. ... more

Speaker: Pat Conaway

I teach EFL classes to freshman students in the medical, agriculture, engineering, humanities, and education departments. It’s a lot of fun seeing the different personalities of the students with such ... more

12:45 Sun

Investigating the experience of non-Japanese long-term EFL teaching professionals at Japanese Universities #107

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:45-13:20 JST

As the population of Japan gets older and the number of students falls, hiring new teaching staff at Japanese universities has become less frequent than in the past. As a result, the average age of long-term teaching professionals has risen, and it is worthwhile to consider how these teachers are coping in the profession after many years of teaching. This presentation will briefly share some research on teacher burnout, and then focus on the findings from a series of interviews which were held with non-Japanese teachers of English at Japanese universities. Common problems and issues such as burnout, administrative changes, and other issues will be discussed. Some tips on long-term survival in a Japanese tertiary institution are offered and audience comments are welcomed.

As the population of Japan gets older and the number of students falls, hiring new teaching staff at Japanese universities has become less frequent than in the past. As a result, the average age of long-term teaching professionals has risen, and it is worthwhile to consider how these teachers are coping in the profession after many years of teaching. This presentation will briefly share some research on teacher burnout, and then focus on the findings from a series of interviews which were held with non-Japanese teachers of English at Japanese universities. Common problems and issues such as burnout, administrative changes, ... more

12:45 Sun

Learning about teaching through foreign language learning #167

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:45-13:20 JST

What is the impact of learning a foreign language on EFL teachers? This presentation looks at the advantages and difficulties of EFL teachers learning beginner-level French as a foreign language (FFL). The class was offered to EFL teachers at the same university as a professional development opportunity, and was held twice a week for two semesters. The presenters are the teacher, one of the students, and the class administrator. They examine the results of student questionnaires and interviews which highlight the successes and challenges the students reported from learning FFL. The results indicate that the time commitments are the biggest impediment, while the benefits include French language learning, team bonding and insights into how it is to be a language student. Based on these benefits, the class administrator presents foreign language learning as an approach to EFL teacher development. By exploring the impact of EFL teachers learning FFL, this presentation contributes to the discussion on beliefs about learning, student empathy and faculty development.

What is the impact of learning a foreign language on EFL teachers? This presentation looks at the advantages and difficulties of EFL teachers learning beginner-level French as a foreign language (FFL). The class was offered to EFL teachers at the same university as a professional development opportunity, and was held twice a week for two semesters. The presenters are the teacher, one of the students, and the class administrator. They examine the results of student questionnaires and interviews which highlight the successes and challenges the students reported from learning FFL. The results indicate that the time commitments are the biggest ... more

Speaker: Paul Mathieson

I am an associate professor in the Department of Clinical English at Nara Medical University. I am the co-ordinator of the nursing English programme at NMU, and I teach both ... more

Speaker: Francesco Bolstad

Professor Francesco Bolstad combines his background in biology and economics with his love of education and language as Head of the Department of Clinical English at Nara Medical University. His ... more

Speaker: Claire Murray

Claire Murray has taught English in New Zealand and Japan for more than 12 years. Her research interests include learning strategies and vocabulary acquisition

12:45 Sun

I am a Genius! #174

Interactive Poster Session
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:45-13:20 JST

How can teachers engage their students in meaningful learning, spark intrinsic motivation and allow their students to direct their own learning? Once used at Google, 'Genius Hour' was used as a way to engage employees and boost productivity. It has now grown into an educational tool and is used by educators and learners around the world. Based on inquiry-led learning, 'Genius Hour' also known as '20% time', gives students autonomy over their own learning whilst also creating a reason to learn. Students choose a topic they are passionate about, decide how to explore it and what questions they want to answer themselves. It is completely student-driven, personalised, not teacher-led, involves no textbook and inclusive because every learner can participate. Time is dedicated to 'Genius Hour' in which learners have a chance to further their chosen area of research. It is also a valuable chance for teachers to learn about their students' passions. If you are interested in finding out more, come to this Interactive Poster Session and find out how this can be applied to your classroom. It will be of interest to all teachers, particularly Young Learner teachers.

How can teachers engage their students in meaningful learning, spark intrinsic motivation and allow their students to direct their own learning? Once used at Google, 'Genius Hour' was used as a way to engage employees and boost productivity. It has now grown into an educational tool and is used by educators and learners around the world. Based on inquiry-led learning, 'Genius Hour' also known as '20% time', gives students autonomy over their own learning whilst also creating a reason to learn. Students choose a topic they are passionate about, decide how to explore it and what questions they want to ... more

Speaker: Esther Ratcliff

I have taught a wide age range of learners in Spain, Portugal and Japan. I currently work at Asia University, Tokyo. I hold BA in English and Spanish, DELTA and ... more

12:45 Sun

How to organize and plan your own online event or conference #198

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 12:45-14:05 JST

JALTCALL2020 was the first major JALT conference ever to be held online. It was recognized as a huge success, bringing together almost 100 presenters and attendees from over 60 countries. Participants talked of the event being ‘historically important’ in the way it brought people together in a time of crisis. Yet the transition online was organized in barely two months. The conference team was faced with many challenges, such as building this online system, organising how presenters share their work, ensuring attendees could navigate the online schedule, managing registration/ticketing, hosting online rooms, communicating with their presenters, and creating opportunities for social interaction. They also needed to consider live and asynchronous options and how to share recordings with a wider audience post-conference.

During this forum, three members of the JALTCALL2020 team will discuss how it became our SIG’s first completely online conference and how it can be replicated - indeed PanSIG2020 itself was planned using the same online system and framework. Whether you are planning a weekend webinar of your own or a conference with hundreds of attendees, this talk gives you a practical framework to make your own event a success.

JALTCALL2020 was the first major JALT conference ever to be held online. It was recognized as a huge success, bringing together almost 100 presenters and attendees from over 60 countries. Participants talked of the event being ‘historically important’ in the way it brought people together in a time of crisis. Yet the transition online was organized in barely two months. The conference team was faced with many challenges, such as building this online system, organising how presenters share their work, ensuring attendees could navigate the online schedule, managing registration/ticketing, hosting online rooms, communicating with their presenters, and creating opportunities for ... more

Speaker: Erin Noxon

I've got a Dr. on my name, I'm a Google Certified Innovator, and I teach at Sagano High School in Kyoto. Let's see... I've taught communicative English, life science, integrated ... more

Speaker: Louise Ohashi

Louise Ohashi is a CALL/MALL enthusiast who has taught English in a wide range of contexts in Japan and abroad. She is currently an Associate Professor at Meiji University and ... more

Speaker: Gary Ross

Gary is a web developer, designer, and programmer, and the creator of Eventzil.la. He works as an Associate Professor at Kanazawa University where he develops the online learning program at ... more

13:30 Sun

Using a learner corpus to design a placement test #108

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 13:30-14:05 JST

This presentation aims to demonstrate a reliable and efficient method of developing valid constructs for placement tests with the use of corpus techniques. With English medium courses at universities rising, one of the challenges for English language support programs is to determine whether and to what extent students need extra language support. A lack of resources has meant that the English Language Program at International University of Japan has relied heavily on the TOEIC ITP test to place students, but over the years this has proved unreliable. This presentation will explain how instructors at IUJ have designed the grammar component of an in-house placement test. In particular, the presenter will outline how constructs for the test were developed from three sources of data: the ability of learners at an intermediate level as derived from a learner corpus; the experience of instructors in the program; the demands of academic writing at the graduate level as based on an academic corpus. The literature on test design offers little guidance for teachers on how to use corpora to make decisions about constructs. This presentation will begin to address that gap by demonstrating how to search learner corpora and handle the language data.

This presentation aims to demonstrate a reliable and efficient method of developing valid constructs for placement tests with the use of corpus techniques. With English medium courses at universities rising, one of the challenges for English language support programs is to determine whether and to what extent students need extra language support. A lack of resources has meant that the English Language Program at International University of Japan has relied heavily on the TOEIC ITP test to place students, but over the years this has proved unreliable. This presentation will explain how instructors at IUJ have designed the grammar component ... more

Speaker: Parsons Daniel

Teacher of EAP to international students of economics, business, politics and international relations. Research interest in corpus linguistics applications to EAP.

13:30 Sun

Teaching film and literature in the EFL classroom. #143

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 13:30-14:05 JST

It is well known in the EFL world that film and fiction can be incredibly engaging for students. Through the media of film and literature, it is my belief that students are able to not only practice their listening and reading skills, but also develop their speaking and writing skills as well through class discussion and written assignments. Therefore, with a graduate and post-graduate background in Literature, I hoped to replicate an accessible seminar-style course, similar to my own educational experience, with a class of Upper-Intermediate students at a Japanese university.

This presentation outlines the pedagogical methods, topics and format adopted, as well as highlighting some of the chosen texts and rationales for their use, which attempted to successfully bring a native-level film and literature university course into an EFL conversation classroom. It will also present and assess the strategies used to make authentic, ungraded film and short fiction accessible, engaging and a source of fruitful discussion for students.

It is well known in the EFL world that film and fiction can be incredibly engaging for students. Through the media of film and literature, it is my belief that students are able to not only practice their listening and reading skills, but also develop their speaking and writing skills as well through class discussion and written assignments. Therefore, with a graduate and post-graduate background in Literature, I hoped to replicate an accessible seminar-style course, similar to my own educational experience, with a class of Upper-Intermediate students at a Japanese university.

This presentation outlines the pedagogical methods, topics and format adopted, ... more

Speaker: Tom Paterson

I have been living and working in Tokyo for 6 years and I am currently teaching at Asia University. My research interests include Literature, Film, Content-based instruction, and Task-based learning.

13:30 Sun

Gender and Climate Change #187

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 13:30-14:50 JST

The solutions to the climate emergency require input from a diverse mix of people as not fully utilizing talents will lead to further problems. Women will be affected more severely as a result of climate change with UN figures indicating that up to 80% of displaced people will be women. This forum examines issues related to gender and the environment both within Japan and globally. Brent Simmonds will discuss the role of female, youth climate activists including Greta Thunberg and Eva Tolage and demonstrate a classroom research project in which students discuss what they can do to solve problems in the present climate emergency. Jennie Roloff Rothman will focus on using the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to promote equality and sustainability. Catriona Takeuchi will talk about bringing global issues narratives into the classroom. Finally, Mark Brierley will highlight issues of gender, environmental degradation, and food supply using European and American near-future science fiction movies, in particular, the 1973 dystopia, Soylent Green.

The solutions to the climate emergency require input from a diverse mix of people as not fully utilizing talents will lead to further problems. Women will be affected more severely as a result of climate change with UN figures indicating that up to 80% of displaced people will be women. This forum examines issues related to gender and the environment both within Japan and globally. Brent Simmonds will discuss the role of female, youth climate activists including Greta Thunberg and Eva Tolage and demonstrate a classroom research project in which students discuss what they can do to solve problems in ... more

Speaker: Mark Brierley

Extensive reader. Low energy builder. Active Passivist. Passive activist.

Speaker: Catriona Chalmers Takeuchi

Teacher of Young Learners, teacher- trainer, freelance writer and editor.

Speaker: Brent Simmonds

English teacher , keen environmentalist

Speaker: Jennie Roloff Rothman

Principal Lecturer: Professional Development-Teacher Development Member of the following SIGs: GILE, TD, CUE, CT, THT

14:15 Sun

In-class surveys one question at a time #109

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 14:15-14:50 JST

Teachers gather valuable information about students from in-class surveys often administered at the beginning or the end of a course. Responses may be quantitative or qualitative in nature, and they may assist teachers in action research designs to guide changes during the course or in a subsequent one. Questions may ask how well a lesson or some component is perceived as instructive, utile, or motivating, whether they are asked with ranking, choice, or open-essay format. Japanese university students are no stranger to feedback surveys; institutions require them at the end of courses to determine teacher and course effectiveness. But, students may face too many administrative surveys in a year. If they are required only to rank items, it is easy to become desensitized or demotivated and intentionally mark the answers inappropriately. Student anonymity is a prized feature of good surveys, but it may not always be practical to a teacher, especially if comparisons are desired between certain groups. This presentation will describe how weekly surveys of just one essay question each were delivered, and how the responses were compiled then presented back to students with insightful comments. Both teacher and students gained useful knowledge and perspective in the process.

Teachers gather valuable information about students from in-class surveys often administered at the beginning or the end of a course. Responses may be quantitative or qualitative in nature, and they may assist teachers in action research designs to guide changes during the course or in a subsequent one. Questions may ask how well a lesson or some component is perceived as instructive, utile, or motivating, whether they are asked with ranking, choice, or open-essay format. Japanese university students are no stranger to feedback surveys; institutions require them at the end of courses to determine teacher and course effectiveness. But, students ... more

Speaker: Glen Hill

I have a master's degree in science, but I've been teaching English in Japan since 1998. For the past 15+ years, I've been a tenured professor at a science university, ... more

14:15 Sun

Learning western literature through computational thinking #142

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 14:15-14:50 JST

The study aims to discuss the extent to which project-based learning (PjBL) involved in digital technology can create an environment for Computational Thinking (CT), which in turn might enhance the learning of Western literature in the Expanding Circle where English is used as a foreign language. While PjBL and CT have gained much attention from educators in Taiwan, teachers of literature are confronting a serious challenge resulting from students’ doubts about the function and practicality of learning literature. It is in such a context that I blend CT into a required course for English majors 2019-2020, “Introduction to Western Literature.” One purpose of this study is to observe how students’ familiarity with computer and the Internet enables them to concretize and present their understanding of literature. The other purpose is to utilize the elements of CT in class activities so that students could learn to simplify literary works by systemizing information and organizing ideas in the process of completing such projects as story creation, mind map, and micro movie. The result of this study is based on the execution of students’ projects, along with the instructor’s observations, and the analysis of a post-activity questionnaire.

The study aims to discuss the extent to which project-based learning (PjBL) involved in digital technology can create an environment for Computational Thinking (CT), which in turn might enhance the learning of Western literature in the Expanding Circle where English is used as a foreign language. While PjBL and CT have gained much attention from educators in Taiwan, teachers of literature are confronting a serious challenge resulting from students’ doubts about the function and practicality of learning literature. It is in such a context that I blend CT into a required course for English majors 2019-2020, “Introduction to Western Literature.” ... more

Speaker: Li-Wen Chang

Li-Wen Chang is an assistant professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan. Her research interests include American literature, feminism, New Woman writings, ... more

14:15 Sun

Mindfulness: Making the Most of Class Time #169

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 14:15-14:50 JST

While what we do as teachers is undeniably important, how we do it might be equally important. Keeping focus when a student is disruptive, knowing when to end an activity, and motivating students all take skill. While experience and knowledge of pedagogy can make situations easier to manage, teachers can also benefit by staying in the moment with a heightened sense of awareness. A mindfulness practice can help a teacher achieve a greater level of awareness and improved decision making on class day.

At the same time, there are things we can do to encourage our students to be mindful. Research indicates, for example, that subtle changes in the way teachers give instructions could make students more mindful. Moreover, some schools are introducing mindfulness meditation training for students. Japanese professors based in Hikone have instituted a U.K.-based mindfulness program here in Japan. The “mbsr study group” conducts research and offers mindfulness workshops for teachers in Tokyo and Kansai with an aim to introduce mindfulness in Japan's public schools.

This presentation identifies several approaches to cultivate mindfulness in education and provides brief descriptions of their efficacy. Journal entries written by teachers involved in mindfulness meditation will be shared.

While what we do as teachers is undeniably important, how we do it might be equally important. Keeping focus when a student is disruptive, knowing when to end an activity, and motivating students all take skill. While experience and knowledge of pedagogy can make situations easier to manage, teachers can also benefit by staying in the moment with a heightened sense of awareness. A mindfulness practice can help a teacher achieve a greater level of awareness and improved decision making on class day.

At the same time, there are things we can do to encourage our students to be mindful. ... more

Speaker: Karl Hedberg

Karl Hedberg works at Shiga University.

Speaker: John Spiri

John Spiri first came to Japan in 1997 and presently works as an associate professor in the education department at Gifu Shotoku Gakuen University. John was motivated to conduct mindfulness ... more

14:15 Sun

Self-reflection in intercultural communication #190

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 14:15-15:50 JST

Cultural awareness has commonly been discussed in the previous literature in relation to comparisons among cultural or national groups. However, Baker (2012) argues that such view should be reconsidered; he brings intercultural awareness into the spotlight defining it as “a conscious understanding of the role culturally based forms, practices, and frames of understanding can have in intercultural communication, and an ability to put these conceptions into practice in a flexible and context specific manner in real time communication.” Based on Baker’s notion of intercultural awareness, this study describes its application in the Japanese EFL context by emphasizing the importance of self-reflection type of assignments and classroom activities. Therefore, this exploratory study aims at examining students’ intercultural awareness development throughout a year, by analyzing their final project titled Our Intercultural Encounters which used Council of Europe’s Autobiography of Intercultural Encounters as resource material. The qualitative analysis of students’ group discussions shows a deeper understanding of themselves, their biases, and their own culture, as well as a higher level of intercultural understanding.

Cultural awareness has commonly been discussed in the previous literature in relation to comparisons among cultural or national groups. However, Baker (2012) argues that such view should be reconsidered; he brings intercultural awareness into the spotlight defining it as “a conscious understanding of the role culturally based forms, practices, and frames of understanding can have in intercultural communication, and an ability to put these conceptions into practice in a flexible and context specific manner in real time communication.” Based on Baker’s notion of intercultural awareness, this study describes its application in the Japanese EFL context by emphasizing the importance of ... more

14:15 Sun

Using Google Forms as Quizzes #186

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 14:15-16:15 JST

​Bill will start the session with a demonstration of Google Forms, and how you should set up your Google Form for students to take quizzes. This overview will include self-grading quizzes as well as quizzes with open-ended answers that the teacher can grade as correct, incorrect, or partially correct. Question types include multiple choice (radio buttons, pull-down menus, and grid style), short answers, and longer open answers. Practical examples and applications of each type will be given. You will learn how to share the activity link with your students, and how you can see their grades. We will also include how to re-use questions from previous quizzes, and how to bulk load several answer choices at one time. Finally, we will cover an advanced technique for separating your students’ replies into different classes.

Then Nathan will introduce participants to a range of online quiz and assessment tools for the classroom. It will begin by building on the first session by demonstrating how Google Forms works in Google Classroom, as an introduction to Google Classroom's rubric tool. This will be followed by an interactive overview of other non-Google platforms such as TED-Ed, Edpuzzle, Online Quiz Creator, and others, while time permits. Resources will be provided in a Google Slides deck for your future reference following the session.

This presentation is sponsored by the Niigata and Matsuyama JALT chapters.

​Bill will start the session with a demonstration of Google Forms, and how you should set up your Google Form for students to take quizzes. This overview will include self-grading quizzes as well as quizzes with open-ended answers that the teacher can grade as correct, incorrect, or partially correct. Question types include multiple choice (radio buttons, pull-down menus, and grid style), short answers, and longer open answers. Practical examples and applications of each type will be given. You will learn how to share the activity link with your students, and how you can see their grades. We will also include ... more

Speaker: Bill Pellowe

Bill Pellowe is an Associate Professor at Kindai University's Fukuoka Campus, where he has taught since 2000. He is currently JALT's Director of Public Relations. He started ELT Calendar (eltcalendar.com) ... more

Speaker: Nate Gildart

Nathan Gildart is a History and Individuals & Societies Teacher at Nagoya International School and Educational Technology Consultant. He is a Google for Education Certified Trainer, Innovator, and Google Educator ... more

15:00 Sun

Templates for term paper research notes #101

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 15:00-15:35 JST

Academic Writing is a required two-semester course for first year students at Kyoto University. In the second semester all students write a long essay (normally a literature review) of at least 1,000 words. Textbooks typically focus on the language used (paragraph and essay structure, common genres, academic style, etc.), but aside from stressing the importance of paraphrasing and summarizing to avoid plagiarism, no guidance is given on how to take notes while conducting research. Students must efficiently read through multiple sources, and synthesize points into a coherent argument. This requires research and cognitive skills not covered in the textbooks. Dedicated software exists to help researchers organize their work, but teachers are not likely to require students to use such apps. The presenter will show simple templates in MS Word and Excel, and discuss how he uses them in his classes.

Academic Writing is a required two-semester course for first year students at Kyoto University. In the second semester all students write a long essay (normally a literature review) of at least 1,000 words. Textbooks typically focus on the language used (paragraph and essay structure, common genres, academic style, etc.), but aside from stressing the importance of paraphrasing and summarizing to avoid plagiarism, no guidance is given on how to take notes while conducting research. Students must efficiently read through multiple sources, and synthesize points into a coherent argument. This requires research and cognitive skills not covered ... more

Speaker: David Kolf

Part-time Lecturer at Kyoto University ILAS, where I teach Academic Writing, and at Ryukoku University, where I have writing and communication classes for first-year students.

15:00 Sun

Intercultural Communication and Mobility #131

SIG Forum
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 15:00-16:20 JST

For the PanSIG 2020's forum, the ICLE SIG united forces with the Study Abroad SIG and will discuss intercultural communication and mobility. We believe that the challenge of communication with people from different backgrounds is even more enhanced when working or studying with people from different cultures and in various contexts. The majority of students go abroad without sufficient intercultural preparation. How can we, as teachers, prepare students for dealing with this intercultural communication challenge? Some of the topics will include: • Best practices in study abroad • Study abroad risk management • Effectiveness of study abroad • Cultural differences in intercultural communication • Developing intercultural competence

We will begin with Roxana Sandu, followed by Najma Janjua and then Bruce Lander and Kaori. We will then do some Q&A and finish with Daniel Velasco's video at https://youtu.be/7rZ6IAU0If0

For the PanSIG 2020's forum, the ICLE SIG united forces with the Study Abroad SIG and will discuss intercultural communication and mobility. We believe that the challenge of communication with people from different backgrounds is even more enhanced when working or studying with people from different cultures and in various contexts. The majority of students go abroad without sufficient intercultural preparation. How can we, as teachers, prepare students for dealing with this intercultural communication challenge? Some of the topics will include: • Best practices in study abroad • Study abroad risk management • Effectiveness of study abroad • Cultural differences in intercultural communication • ... more

Speaker: DANIEL VELASCO

Daniel Velasco is an Assistant Professor in the College of Intercultural Communication at Rikkyo University in Tokyo, Japan. He is also an adjunct Assistant Professor for the Department of International ... more

Speaker: Kaori ONO

Speaker: Najma Janjua

Najma Janjua is a professor in the Department of Languages at Kawasaki Medical School in Kurashiki, Japan. She holds a doctorate in human genetics from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, ... more

Speaker: Bruce Lander

Bruce Lander teaches in the graduate school of Language and Communication at Matsuyama University, Ehime, Japan. He has been a teacher for almost 20 years, most of which in ... more

15:45 Sun

Towards PanSIG2021 #185

Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 15:45-16:20 JST

A meeting to discuss next year's conference.

A meeting to discuss next year's conference.

Speaker: Gabriela Schmidt

Coordinator of JALT CEFR & LP SIG

Speaker: Bill Pellowe

Bill Pellowe is an Associate Professor at Kindai University's Fukuoka Campus, where he has taught since 2000. He is currently JALT's Director of Public Relations. He started ELT Calendar (eltcalendar.com) ... more

Speaker: Jean-Pierre Richard

JALT2020 Program Chair PanSIG 2022 Chair

Moderator: Mark Brierley

Extensive reader. Low energy builder. Active Passivist. Passive activist.

15:45 Sun

A peer support program for incoming students #196

Presentation
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 15:45-16:20 JST

"The integration of new students into college programs can be a challenge for both the staff and the new students themselves. The start of college can be an anxiety filled time and the provision of support is not only appreciated by the new students, but also helps them gain a sense of belonging, form social networks, and increase confidence. The institution itself benefits from greater student satisfaction and improved student retention. This presentation will look at the evolution of a peer support program at a small university’s English department during its orientation period. The Peer Support Team (PST) involved twenty 2nd year students assisting forty-one incoming students in their transition from high school to university. First, an overview of the current program and how it was developed over several years will be presented. This will be followed by an examination of the results of post-participation questionnaires on both student cohorts. The mixed method research provided positive feedback on the program and its implementation, as well as identifying points for improvement. Time will be allotted to an exchange of ideas and strategies used to integrate incoming students into the university system, as well as to increase student involvement within the given department and the institution. Participants should leave the session with a renewed sense of the importance of how they integrate incoming students into the university environment."

"The integration of new students into college programs can be a challenge for both the staff and the new students themselves. The start of college can be an anxiety filled time and the provision of support is not only appreciated by the new students, but also helps them gain a sense of belonging, form social networks, and increase confidence. The institution itself benefits from greater student satisfaction and improved student retention. This presentation will look at the evolution of a peer support program at a small university’s English department during its orientation period. The Peer Support Team (PST) involved twenty ... more

15:45 Sun

A peer support program for incoming students #211

Presentation
Sun, Jun 21, 15:45-16:20 JST

The integration of new students into college programs can be a challenge for both the staff and the new students themselves. The start of college can be an anxiety filled time and the provision of support is not only appreciated by the new students, but also helps them gain a sense of belonging, form social networks, and increase confidence. The institution itself benefits from greater student satisfaction and improved student retention. This presentation will look at the evolution of a peer support program at a small university’s English department during its orientation period. The Peer Support Team (PST) involved twenty 2nd year students assisting forty-one incoming students in their transition from high school to university. First, an overview of the current program and how it was developed over several years will be presented. This will be followed by an examination of the results of post-participation questionnaires on both student cohorts. The mixed method research provided positive feedback on the program and its implementation, as well as identifying points for improvement. Time will be allotted to an exchange of ideas and strategies used to integrate incoming students into the university system, as well as to increase student involvement within the given department and the institution. Participants should leave the session with a renewed sense of the importance of how they integrate incoming students into the university environment.

The integration of new students into college programs can be a challenge for both the staff and the new students themselves. The start of college can be an anxiety filled time and the provision of support is not only appreciated by the new students, but also helps them gain a sense of belonging, form social networks, and increase confidence. The institution itself benefits from greater student satisfaction and improved student retention. This presentation will look at the evolution of a peer support program at a small university’s English department during its orientation period. The Peer Support Team (PST) involved twenty ... more

16:30 Sun

Closing Panel #202

Open Space
Finished
Sun, Jun 21, 16:30-17:00 JST

Some closing comments about PanSIG2020 and looking forward to the next time we get together.

Some closing comments about PanSIG2020 and looking forward to the next time we get together.

Speaker: Joseph Tomei

Joseph Tomei is a professor in the Faculty of British and American Studies at Kumamoto Gakuen University. He has taught EFL in France, Spain, and Japan at the primary, secondary, ... more

Speaker: Gabriela Schmidt

Coordinator of JALT CEFR & LP SIG

Speaker: Louise Ohashi

Louise Ohashi is a CALL/MALL enthusiast who has taught English in a wide range of contexts in Japan and abroad. She is currently an Associate Professor at Meiji University and ... more

Speaker: Dawn Lucovich

PanSIG Virtual Conference Committee Chair / The University of Nagano, Assistant Professor / Nagano JALT, President

Speaker: Gary Ross

Gary is a web developer, designer, and programmer, and the creator of Eventzil.la. He works as an Associate Professor at Kanazawa University where he develops the online learning program at ... more

Speaker: Amanda Gillis Furutaka

Amanda Gillis-Furutaka is a professor in the Faculty of Foreign Studies at Kyoto Sangyo University, where she has worked since 1992. Before coming to Japan, she taught English in France, ... more

Host: Mark Brierley

Extensive reader. Low energy builder. Active Passivist. Passive activist.